Changeset 20828163


Ignore:
Timestamp:
02/04/2005 07:30:54 AM (19 years ago)
Author:
Bruce Dubbs <bdubbs@…>
Branches:
10.0, 10.1, 11.0, 11.1, 11.2, 11.3, 12.0, 12.1, 6.0, 6.1, 6.2, 6.2.0, 6.2.0-rc1, 6.2.0-rc2, 6.3, 6.3-rc1, 6.3-rc2, 6.3-rc3, 7.10, 7.4, 7.5, 7.6, 7.6-blfs, 7.6-systemd, 7.7, 7.8, 7.9, 8.0, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 9.0, 9.1, basic, bdubbs/svn, elogind, gimp3, gnome, kde5-13430, kde5-14269, kde5-14686, kea, ken/TL2024, ken/inkscape-core-mods, ken/tuningfonts, krejzi/svn, lazarus, lxqt, nosym, perl-modules, plabs/newcss, plabs/python-mods, python3.11, qt5new, rahul/power-profiles-daemon, renodr/vulkan-addition, systemd-11177, systemd-13485, trunk, upgradedb, xry111/intltool, xry111/llvm18, xry111/soup3, xry111/test-20220226, xry111/xf86-video-removal
Children:
843cc38c
Parents:
fb31251
Message:

Minor wording changes in chapters 1 and 2

git-svn-id: svn://svn.linuxfromscratch.org/BLFS/trunk/BOOK@3390 af4574ff-66df-0310-9fd7-8a98e5e911e0

Files:
10 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
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  • general.ent

    rfb31251 r20828163  
    1 <!ENTITY day          "03">
     1<!ENTITY day          "04">
    22<!ENTITY month        "02">
    33<!ENTITY year         "2005">
    44<!ENTITY version      "svn-&year;&month;&day;">
    5 <!ENTITY releasedate  "February &day;rd, &year;">
     5<!ENTITY releasedate  "February &day;th, &year;">
    66<!ENTITY pubdate      "&year;-&month;-&day;"> <!-- metadata req. by TLDP -->
    77<!ENTITY blfs-version "cvs">                  <!-- cvs|[release #] -->
  • introduction/important/beyond.xml

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    8585
    8686<listitem><para>Many of the newer packages follow the <command>./configure
    87 &amp;&amp; make &amp;&amp; make install</command> <emphasis>dance</emphasis>
    88 routine. Help on the options accepted by configure can be obtained via the
     87&amp;&amp; make &amp;&amp; make install</command> process.
     88Help on the options accepted by configure can be obtained via the
    8989command <command>./configure --help</command>.</para></listitem>
    9090
  • introduction/important/patches.xml

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    1515
    1616<para>As you follow the various sections in the book, you will observe that
    17 the book includes various patches that are required for a successful and
     17the book occasionally includes patches that are required for a successful and
    1818secure installation of the packages. The general policy of the book is to
    1919include patches that fall in one of the following criteria:</para>
  • introduction/important/pkgmgt.xml

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    1717to the <acronym>LFS</acronym> Book. A Package Manager allows tracking
    1818the installation of files making it easy to remove and upgrade packages.
    19 And before you begin to wonder, NO - this section does not talk about any
     19And before you begin to wonder, NO&mdash;this section does not talk about any
    2020particular package manager, nor does it recommend one. What it provides is
    2121a roundup of the more popular techniques and how they work. The perfect
     
    2929<itemizedlist>
    3030<listitem><para>Dealing with package management takes the focus away from
    31 the goals of these books - Teaching how a Linux System is built.</para></listitem>
     31the goals of these books&mdash;teaching how a Linux system is built.</para></listitem>
    3232<listitem><para>There are multiple solutions for package management, each having
    3333its strengths and drawbacks. Including one that satifies all audiences is
     
    4343<title>Upgrade Issues</title>
    4444
    45 <para>A Package Manager makes it easy to upgrade to newer versions as and when they
     45<para>A Package Manager makes it easy to upgrade to newer versions when they
    4646are released. Generally the instructions in the <acronym>LFS</acronym> and
    4747<acronym>BLFS</acronym> Book can be used to upgrade to the newer versions.
    48 Following are some points that you should be aware of when upgrading
     48Here are some points that you should be aware of when upgrading
    4949packages, especially on a running system.</para>
    5050
    5151<itemizedlist>
    52 <listitem><para>It is recommended that if one of the toolchain package (glibc, gcc,
     52<listitem><para>If one of the toolchain package (glibc, gcc,
    5353binutils) needs to be upgraded to a newer minor vesion, it is safer to rebuild
    5454<acronym>LFS</acronym>. Though you <emphasis>may</emphasis> be able to get by
    55 rebuilding all the packages in their dependency order. We do not recommend the
    56 latter. For example, if glibc-2.2.x needs to be updated to glibc-2.3.x, it is safer
     55rebuilding all the packages in their dependency order. We do not recommend it.
     56For example, if glibc-2.2.x needs to be updated to glibc-2.3.x, it is safer
    5757to rebuild. For micro version updates, a simple reinstallation usually works, but
    5858is not guaranteed. For example, upgrading from glibc-2.3.1 to glibc-2.3.2 will not
    5959usually cause any problems.</para></listitem>
    6060<listitem><para>If a package containing a shared library is updated, and if the
    61 soname of the library changes, then all the packages dynamically linked to the
     61name of the library changes, then all the packages dynamically linked to the
    6262library need to be recompiled to link against the newer library. (Note that there
    63 is no corelation between the package version and the soname of the library.) For
    64 example, consider a package foo-1.2.3 that installs a shared library with soname
     63is no corelation between the package version and the name of the library.) For
     64example, consider a package foo-1.2.3 that installs a shared library with name
    6565<filename>libfoo.so.1</filename>. Say you upgrade the package to a newer version
    66 foo-1.2.4 that installs a shared library with soname <filename>libfoo.so.2</filename>.
     66foo-1.2.4 that installs a shared library with name <filename>libfoo.so.2</filename>.
    6767In this case, all packages that are dynamically linked to <filename>libfoo.so.1</filename>
    6868need to be recompiled to link against <filename>libfoo.so.2</filename>. Note that
     
    9191need for a package manager because they know the packages intimately and know
    9292what files are installed by each package. Some users also do not need any
    93 package management because they plan on rebuilding the entire <acronym>LFS</acronym>
     93package management because they plan on rebuilding the entire system
    9494when a package is changed.</para>
    9595
     
    130130instructions may not install the package properly:</para>
    131131
    132 <screen><userinput><command>./configure --prefix=/usr/pkg/libfoo/1.1 &amp;&amp;
    133 make &amp;&amp;
     132<screen><userinput><command>./configure --prefix=/usr/pkg/libfoo/1.1
     133make
    134134make install</command></userinput></screen>
    135135
     
    141141This approach works as follows:</para>
    142142
    143 <screen><userinput><command>./configure --prefix=/usr &amp;&amp;
    144 make &amp;&amp;
     143<screen><userinput><command>./configure --prefix=/usr
     144make
    145145make DESTDIR=/usr/pkg/libfoo/1.1 install</command></userinput></screen>
    146146
     
    177177calls that modify the filesystem. For this approach to work, all the executables
    178178need to be dymanically linked without the suid or sgid bit. Preloading the
    179 library may cause some unwanted side-effects during installation; hence
     179library may cause some unwanted side-effects during installation. Therefore,
    180180do perform some tests to ensure that the package manager does not break
    181181anything and logs all the appropriate files.</para>
     
    193193
    194194<para>This approach is used by most of the package managers found in the
    195 commercial distributions. Examples of package Managers that follow this
    196 approach are RPM, pkg-utils, Debian's apt, Gentoo's Portage system.</para>
     195commercial distributions. Examples of package managers that follow this
     196approach are RPM, pkg-utils, Debian's apt, and Gentoo's Portage system.</para>
    197197
    198198</sect3>
  • introduction/important/position.xml

    rfb31251 r20828163  
    2222<para>In traditional Unix systems, <filename>/usr</filename> usually
    2323contains files that come with the system distribution, and the <filename>
    24 /usr/local</filename> tree is free for the local administrator to add things
    25 to.  The only really hard and fast rule is that Unix distributions should not
    26 touch <filename>/usr/local</filename>, except perhaps for creating the basic
     24/usr/local</filename> tree is free for the local administrator to manage.
     25The only really hard and fast rule is that Unix distributions should not
     26touch <filename>/usr/local</filename>, except perhaps to create the basic
    2727directories within it.</para>
    2828
  • introduction/important/unpacking.xml

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    1212</sect1info>
    1313<?dbhtml filename="unpacking.html"?>
    14 <title>Notes on downloading, unpacking and compiling software</title>
     14<title>Notes on building software</title>
    1515
    16 <para>Those people who have built a <acronym>LFS</acronym> system will be aware
     16<para>Those people who have built an <acronym>LFS</acronym> system will be aware
    1717of the general principles of downloading and unpacking software.  We will
    1818however repeat some of that information here for those new to building
     
    2424installation instructions.</para>
    2525
    26 <para>While you can keep the source <acronym>TAR</acronym> balls anywhere you like, we
     26<para>While you can keep the source files anywhere you like, we
    2727assume that you have unpacked them and unzipped any required patches
    2828into <filename>/usr/src</filename>.</para>
     
    3939
    4040<para>If a file is tar'ed and gzip'ed, it is unpacked by running one of
    41 the following two commands, depending on the filename:</para>
     41the following commands, depending on the filename:</para>
    4242
    4343<screen><command>tar -xvzf filename.tar.gz
     
    5454<screen><command>bzcat filename.tar.bz2 | tar -xv</command></screen>
    5555
    56 <para>Finally, you need to be able to unpack patches which are generally
    57 not tar'ed.  The best way to do this is to copy the patch file to
    58 <filename>/usr/src</filename> and then to run one of the following
    59 commands depending on whether the file is .gz or .bz2:</para>
     56<para>Finally, you sometimes need to be able to unpack patches which are
     57generally not tar'ed.  The best way to do this is to copy the patch file to
     58<filename>/usr/src</filename> and then to run one of the following commands
     59depending on whether the file is .gz or .bz2:</para>
    6060
    6161<screen><command>gunzip patchname.gz
  • introduction/welcome/askhelp.xml

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    7575
    7676<para>Expect guidance instead of specific instructions. If you are
    77 instructed to read something, please do so, it generally implies that
     77instructed to read something, please do so. It generally implies that
    7878the answer was way too obvious and that the question would not have been asked
    7979if a little research was done prior to asking. The volunteers in the mailing
  • introduction/welcome/conventions.xml

    rfb31251 r20828163  
    2121<blockquote><para>This form of text is designed to be typed exactly
    2222as seen unless otherwise noted in the surrounding text.  It is also used
    23 in the explanation sections to identify which of the commands is being
    24 referred to.</para></blockquote>
     23in the explanation sections to identify references to specific commands.</para>
     24</blockquote>
    2525
    2626<para><filename>install-info: unknown option
     
    2929<blockquote><para>This form of text (fixed width text) is showing screen
    3030output, probably as the result of commands issued and is also used to
    31 show filenames such as <filename>/etc/lilo.conf</filename></para></blockquote>
     31show filenames such as <filename>/boot/grub/grub.conf</filename></para></blockquote>
    3232
    3333<para><emphasis>Emphasis</emphasis></para>
     
    5757<para><replaceable>[REPLACED TEXT]</replaceable></para>
    5858
    59 <blockquote><para>This form of text is used to encapsulate text that is
    60 not to be typed as seen or copy and pasted.</para></blockquote>
     59<blockquote><para>This form of text is used to encapsulate text that should be
     60modified and is not to be typed as seen or copy and pasted.</para></blockquote>
    6161
    6262</sect1>
  • introduction/welcome/which.xml

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    1414<title>Which sections of the book do I want?</title>
    1515
    16 <para>Unlike the Linux From Scratch book, <acronym>BLFS</acronym> isn't 
     16<para>Unlike the Linux From Scratch book, <acronym>BLFS</acronym> isn't
    1717designed to be followed in a linear manner.  This is because <acronym>LFS
    18 </acronym> provides instructions on how to create a base system which is 
    19 capable of turning into anything from a web server to a multimedia desktop 
    20 system.  <acronym>BLFS</acronym> is where we try to guide you through going
    21 from the base system to your intended destination and so choice is very much
    22 involved.</para>
     18</acronym> provides instructions on how to create a base system which is
     19capable of turning into anything from a web server to a multimedia desktop
     20system.  <acronym>BLFS</acronym> is where we try to guide you in the process of
     21going from the base system to your intended destination. Choice is very
     22much involved.</para>
    2323
    2424<para>Everyone who reads the book will want to read certain sections.  The
    25 <xref linkend="introduction"/> part - which you are currently
    26 reading - contains generic information.  Especially take note of the
     25<xref linkend="introduction"/> part&ndash;which you are currently
     26reading&ndash;contains generic information.  Especially take note of the
    2727information in Important Information (<xref linkend="intro-important"/>), as
    2828this contains comments about how to unpack software and various other aspects
  • postlfs/config/autofs.xml

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    1919</sect1info>
    2020<?dbhtml filename="autofs.html"?>
    21 <title>Automate Mounting of Removable File Systems</title>
     21<title>Automate Mounting of File Systems</title>
    2222<indexterm zone="autofs">
    2323<primary sortas="a-Autofs">Autofs</primary></indexterm>
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