Changeset 766bbe4


Ignore:
Timestamp:
05/04/2003 05:39:22 PM (19 years ago)
Author:
Larry Lawrence <larry@…>
Branches:
10.0, 10.1, 11.0, 6.0, 6.1, 6.2, 6.2.0, 6.2.0-rc1, 6.2.0-rc2, 6.3, 6.3-rc1, 6.3-rc2, 6.3-rc3, 7.10, 7.4, 7.5, 7.6, 7.6-blfs, 7.6-systemd, 7.7, 7.8, 7.9, 8.0, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 9.0, 9.1, basic, bdubbs/svn, elogind, gnome, kde5-13430, kde5-14269, kde5-14686, ken/refactor-virt, krejzi/svn, lazarus, nosym, perl-modules, qt5new, systemd-11177, systemd-13485, trunk, v5_0, v5_0-pre1, v5_1, v5_1-pre1, xry111/git-date, xry111/git-date-for-trunk, xry111/git-date-test
Children:
342dc1e
Parents:
3fedd09
Message:

tagged some writeups

git-svn-id: svn://svn.linuxfromscratch.org/BLFS/trunk/BOOK@903 af4574ff-66df-0310-9fd7-8a98e5e911e0

Files:
5 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • index.xml

    r3fedd09 r766bbe4  
    33                        "/usr/share/docbook/docbookx.dtd" [
    44
    5 <!ENTITY version "20030503">
    6 <!ENTITY releasedate "May  3rd, 2003">
     5<!ENTITY version "20030504">
     6<!ENTITY releasedate "May  4th, 2003">
    77
    88<!ENTITY % book SYSTEM "book/book.ent">
  • postlfs/config/inputrc.xml

    r3fedd09 r766bbe4  
    33<title>/etc/inputrc</title>
    44
    5 <para>Inputrc deals with the mapping of the keyboard for certain
    6 situations.  This file is the start-up file used by readline - the input
    7 related library used by Bash and most other shells.</para>
     5<para><filename>inputrc</filename> deals with the mapping of the keyboard for
     6certain situations.  This file is the start-up file used by
     7<application>readline</application> - the input related library used by
     8<application>Bash</application> and most other shells.</para>
    89
    9 <para>For more information see <filename>info bash</filename> -- Node:
    10 Readline Init file as well as <filename>info readline</filename>. There
    11 is a lot that can be done with this one rc file.</para>
     10<para>For more information see <command>info bash</command> -- <emphasis
     11role="strong">Node: Readline Init</emphasis> file as well as
     12<command>info readline</command>. There is a lot that can be done with this
     13one rc file.</para>
    1214
    1315<para>The following is a base <filename>/etc/inputrc</filename> along with
     
    1719same line as commands in <filename>inputrc</filename>.</para>
    1820
    19 <para><screen># Begin /etc/inputrc
     21<screen><userinput><command>cat &gt; /etc/inputrc &lt;&lt; "EOF"</command>
     22# Begin /etc/inputrc
    2023
    2124# Make sure we don't output everything on the 1 line
     
    5457"\eOF": end-of-line
    5558
    56 # End /etc/inputrc</screen></para>
     59# End /etc/inputrc
     60<command>EOF</command></userinput></screen>
    5761
    5862<para>Global values are set in <filename>/etc/inputrc</filename>.
    5963Personal user values as are set in <filename>~/.inputrc</filename>. The
    6064<filename>~/.inputrc</filename> file will override the global settings
    61 file.  The previous page sets up Bash to use
     65file.  The previous page sets up <application>Bash</application> to use
    6266<filename>/etc/inputrc</filename> by default.  If you want your system
    6367to use both, it might be a good idea to place a default
  • postlfs/config/logon.xml

    r3fedd09 r766bbe4  
    33<title>/etc/issue (Customizing your logon)</title>
    44
    5 <para>When you first boot up your new LFS system, the logon screen will
     5<para>When you first boot up your new <acronym>LFS</acronym> system, the logon
     6screen will
    67be nice and plain (as it should be in a bare-bones system).  Many people
    78however, will want their system to display some information in the logon
     
    1314insert information about the system.  There is also the file
    1415<filename>issue.net</filename> which can be used when logging on remotely. 
    15 SSH however, will only use it if you set the option in the
     16<command>ssh</command> however, will only use it if you set the option in the
    1617configuration file and will also <emphasis>not</emphasis> interpret the
    1718escape sequences as shown below.</para>
     
    1920<para>One of the most common things which people want to do is to clear
    2021the screen at each logon.  The easiest way of doing that is to put a
    21 "clear" escape into <filename>/etc/issue</filename>.  A simple way of doing this is to do
    22 <userinput>clear &gt; /etc/issue</userinput>.  This will insert the
    23 relevant escape code into the start of the
     22"clear" escape into <filename>/etc/issue</filename>.  A simple way of doing
     23this is to do <userinput><command>clear &gt; /etc/issue</command></userinput>. 
     24This will insert the relevant escape code into the start of the
    2425<filename>/etc/issue</filename> file.  Note that if you do this, when
    25 you edit the file, you should leave the ^[c character on the first line
    26 alone.</para>
     26you edit the file, you should leave the ^[c character on
     27the first line alone.</para>
    2728
    2829<para>The following escapes are recognized by agetty (the program which
    2930usually parses <filename>/etc/issue</filename>).  This information is from
    30 <userinput>man agetty</userinput> where you can find extra information
     31<command>man agetty</command> where you can find extra information
    3132about the logon process.</para>
    3233
    33 <para>The <filename>issue</filename> file can contain certain escape codes to display various
    34 information.  All escape codes consist of a backslash (\) immediately followed
    35 by one of the letters explained below (so \d in
    36 <filename>/etc/issue</filename> would insert the current date).</para>
     34<para>The <filename>issue</filename> file can contain certain escape codes to
     35display various information.  All escape codes consist of a backslash
     36(\) immediately followed by one of the letters explained
     37below (so \d in <filename>/etc/issue</filename> would
     38insert the current date).</para>
    3739
    38 <para><screen>b   Insert the baudrate of the current line.
     40<screen>b   Insert the baudrate of the current line.
    3941d   Insert the current date.
    4042s   Insert the system name, the name of the operating system.
     
    4850U   Insert the string "1 user" or "&lt;n&gt; users" where &lt;n&gt; is the
    4951    number of current users logged in.
    50 v   Insert the version of the OS, e.g. the build-date etc.</screen></para>
     52v   Insert the version of the <acronym>OS</acronym>, e.g. the build-date etc.</screen>
    5153
    5254</sect1>
  • postlfs/config/profile.xml

    r3fedd09 r766bbe4  
    1212<filename>/etc/passwd</filename> file.  An
    1313interactive non-login shell is started at the command line (e.g.
    14 [prompt]$<userinput>/bin/bash</userinput>).  A non-interactive shell is
    15 usually present when a shell script is running.  It is non-interactive
     14<prompt>[prompt]$</prompt><command>/bin/bash</command>).  A non-interactive
     15shell is usually present when a shell script is running.  It is non-interactive
    1616because it is processing a script and not waiting for user input between
    1717commands.</para>
    1818
    19 <para>For more information see <filename>info bash</filename> -- Nodes:
    20 Bash Startup Files and Interactive Shells</para>
     19<para>For more information see <command>info bash</command> --
     20<emphasis role="strong">Nodes: Bash Startup Files and Interactive
     21Shells.</emphasis></para>
    2122
    2223<para>The following files are needed to make sure that the correct
     
    3536<para>Here is a base <filename>/etc/profile</filename>.  Comments in the
    3637file should explain everything you need.  For more information on the
    37 escape sequences you can use for your prompt (e.g.  the PS1 environment
    38 variable) see <filename>info bash</filename> -- Node: Printing a
    39 Prompt.</para>
    40 
    41 <para><screen># Begin /etc/profile
     38escape sequences you can use for your prompt (e.g.  the
     39<envar>PS1</envar> environment variable) see <command>info
     40bash</command> -- <emphasis role="strong">Node: Printing a
     41Prompt.</emphasis></para>
     42
     43<screen><userinput><command>cat &gt; /etc/profile &lt;&lt; "EOF"</command>
     44# Begin /etc/profile
    4245# Written for Beyond Linux From Scratch
    4346# by James Robertson &lt;jameswrobertson@earthlink.net&gt;
     
    98101export PATH HISTSIZE PS1 LS_COLORS INPUTRC
    99102
    100 # End /etc/profile</screen></para>
     103# End /etc/profile
     104<command>EOF</command></userinput></screen>
    101105
    102106<para>Here is a base <filename>/etc/bashrc</filename>.  Comments in the
    103107file should explain everything you need.</para>
    104108
    105 <para><screen># Begin /etc/bashrc
     109<screen><userinput><command>cat &gt; /etc/bashrc &lt;&lt; "EOF"</command>
     110# Begin /etc/bashrc
    106111# Written for Beyond Linux From Scratch
    107112# by James Robertson &lt;jameswrobertson@earthlink.net&gt;
     
    126131alias ls='ls --color=auto'
    127132
    128 # End /etc/bashrc</screen></para>
     133# End /etc/bashrc
     134<command>EOF</command></userinput></screen>
    129135
    130136<para>Here is a base <filename>~/.bash_profile</filename>.  Comments in
    131137the file should explain everything you need.</para>
    132138
    133 <para><screen># Begin ~/.bash_profile
     139<screen><userinput><command>cat &gt; ~/.bash_profile &lt;&lt; "EOF"</command>
     140# Begin ~/.bash_profile
    134141# Written for Beyond Linux From Scratch
    135142# by James Robertson &lt;jameswrobertson@earthlink.net&gt;
     
    151158export PATH
    152159
    153 # End ~/.bash_profile</screen></para>
     160# End ~/.bash_profile
     161<command>EOF</command></userinput></screen>
    154162
    155163<para>Here is a base <filename>~/.bashrc</filename>.  Comments in the
    156164file should explain everything you need.</para>
    157165
    158 <para><screen># Begin ~/.bashrc
     166<screen><userinput><command>cat &gt; ~/.bashrc &lt;&lt; "EOF"</command>
     167# Begin ~/.bashrc
    159168# Written for Beyond Linux From Scratch
    160169# by James Robertson &lt;jameswrobertson@earthlink.net&gt;
     
    171180fi
    172181
    173 # End ~/.bashrc</screen></para>
     182# End ~/.bashrc
     183<command>EOF</command></userinput></screen>
    174184
    175185<para>Here is a base <filename>~/.bash_logout</filename>.  Comments in
     
    179189handled in the <filename>/etc/issue</filename> file.</para>
    180190
    181 <para><screen># Begin ~/.bash_logout
     191<screen><userinput><command>cat &gt; ~/.bash_logout &lt;&lt; "EOF"</command>
     192# Begin ~/.bash_logout
    182193# Written for Beyond Linux From Scratch
    183194# by James Robertson &lt;jameswrobertson@earthlink.net&gt;
     
    185196# Personal items to perform on logout.
    186197
    187 # End ~/.bash_logout</screen></para>
     198# End ~/.bash_logout
     199<command>EOF</command></userinput></screen>
    188200
    189201<para>If you want to use the <filename>/etc/dircolors</filename> or
  • postlfs/config/random.xml

    r3fedd09 r766bbe4  
    44
    55<para>The Linux kernel supplies a random number generator which is accessed
    6 through <filename>/dev/random</filename> and
    7 <filename>/dev/urandom</filename>.  Programs that utilize the random and
    8 urandom devices, such as OpenSSH, will benefit from these instructions.</para>
     6through <filename class="devicefile">/dev/random</filename> and
     7<filename class="devicefile">/dev/urandom</filename>.  Programs that utilize
     8the random and urandom devices, such as <application>OpenSSH</application>,
     9will benefit from these instructions.</para>
    910
    1011<para>When a Linux system starts up without much operator interaction, the
     
    1617for you automatically.</para>
    1718
    18 <para><screen><userinput>cat &gt; /etc/rc.d/init.d/random &lt;&lt; "EOF"
    19 </userinput>
     19<screen><userinput><command>cat &gt; /etc/rc.d/init.d/random &lt;&lt; "EOF"
     20</command>
    2021#!/bin/sh
    2122# Begin $rc_base/init.d/random
     
    5152
    5253# End $rc_base/init.d/random
    53 <userinput>EOF
    54 chmod 755 /etc/rc.d/init.d/random</userinput></screen></para>
     54<command>EOF
     55chmod 755 /etc/rc.d/init.d/random</command></userinput></screen>
    5556
    5657<para>Create the symbolic links to this file in the relevant
    5758<filename class="directory">rc.d</filename> directories
    5859with the following commands:
    59 <screen><userinput>cd /etc/rc.d/init.d &amp;&amp;
     60<screen><userinput><command>cd /etc/rc.d/init.d &amp;&amp;
    6061ln -sf ../init.d/random ../rc0.d/K45random &amp;&amp;
    6162ln -sf ../init.d/random ../rc2.d/S25random &amp;&amp;
     
    6364ln -sf ../init.d/random ../rc4.d/S25random &amp;&amp;
    6465ln -sf ../init.d/random ../rc5.d/S25random &amp;&amp;
    65 ln -sf ../init.d/random ../rc6.d/K45random</userinput></screen></para>
     66ln -sf ../init.d/random ../rc6.d/K45random</command></userinput></screen></para>
    6667
    6768
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