Changeset 78b3cd61


Ignore:
Timestamp:
09/21/2003 04:44:58 PM (19 years ago)
Author:
Larry Lawrence <larry@…>
Branches:
10.0, 10.1, 11.0, 11.1, 11.2, 6.0, 6.1, 6.2, 6.2.0, 6.2.0-rc1, 6.2.0-rc2, 6.3, 6.3-rc1, 6.3-rc2, 6.3-rc3, 7.10, 7.4, 7.5, 7.6, 7.6-blfs, 7.6-systemd, 7.7, 7.8, 7.9, 8.0, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 9.0, 9.1, basic, bdubbs/svn, elogind, gnome, kde5-13430, kde5-14269, kde5-14686, krejzi/svn, lazarus, nosym, perl-modules, qt5new, systemd-11177, systemd-13485, trunk, upgradedb, v5_0, v5_0-pre1, v5_1, v5_1-pre1, xry111/intltool, xry111/soup3, xry111/test-20220226
Children:
ee61e9f
Parents:
c4f1401
Message:

more review changes

git-svn-id: svn://svn.linuxfromscratch.org/BLFS/trunk/BOOK@1147 af4574ff-66df-0310-9fd7-8a98e5e911e0

Files:
9 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • introduction/welcome/changelog.xml

    rc4f1401 r78b3cd61  
    44
    55<para>Please note that the changelog only lists which editor was
    6 responsible for putting the changes into CVS; please read the Credits
    7 page in Chapter 1 for details on who wrote what.</para>
     6responsible for putting the changes into <acronym>CVS</acronym>; please read
     7the <xref linkend="intro-welcome-credits"/> page in Chapter 1 for details on
     8who wrote what.</para>
    89
    910<para>&version; - &releasedate;</para>
  • introduction/welcome/credits.xml

    rc4f1401 r78b3cd61  
    1 <sect1 id="intro-welcome-credits">
     1<sect1 id="intro-welcome-credits" xreflabel="Credits">
    22<?dbhtml filename="credits.html" dir="introduction"?>
    33<title>Credits</title>
     
    3030<itemizedlist>
    3131
    32 <listitem><para>Chapter 01.  Based on the LFS introductory text by <emphasis>
    33 Gerard Beekmans</emphasis>, modified by <emphasis>Mark Hymers</emphasis>
    34 for <acronym>BLFS</acronym>.</para></listitem>
     32<listitem><para>Chapter 01.  Based on the <acronym>LFS</acronym> introductory
     33text by <emphasis> Gerard Beekmans</emphasis>, modified by <emphasis>
     34Mark Hymers</emphasis> for <acronym>BLFS</acronym>.</para></listitem>
    3535
    3636<listitem><para>Chapter 02: The /usr versus /usr/local debate: <emphasis>Andrew
    3737McMurry</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    3838
    39 <listitem><para>Chapter 02: Going beyond BLFS: <emphasis>Tushar Teredesai
    40 </emphasis>.</para></listitem>
     39<listitem><para>Chapter 02: Going beyond <acronym>BLFS</acronym>: <emphasis>
     40Tushar Teredesai</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    4141
    4242<listitem><para>Chapter 03: /etc/inputrc: <emphasis>Chris Lynn</emphasis>.
     
    5959Peres</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    6060
    61 <listitem><para>Chapter 04: <!--<xref linkend="ch06-firewall"/>-->Firewalling:
    62 <emphasis>Henning Rohde with thanks to Jeff Bauman</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
     61<listitem><para>Chapter 04: Firewalling: <emphasis>Henning Rohde with thanks to
     62Jeff Bauman</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    6363
    6464<listitem><para>Chapter 11: Which <emphasis>Mark Hymers</emphasis> with
     
    191191<listitem><para><emphasis>Scot Mc Pherson</emphasis> for writing the
    192192gnome-1.4.txt hint from which was gathered useful information and for
    193 warning us that Gnome Version 2.0 may not be ready to put in the book.</para>
     193warning us that GNOME Version 2.0 may not be ready to put in the book.</para>
    194194</listitem>
    195195
     
    202202
    203203<listitem><para><emphasis>DJ Lucas</emphasis> for contributing to dhcpcd
    204 patch and many contributions while dhcp section was being developed.</para>
    205 </listitem>
     204patch and many contributions while <acronym>DHCP</acronym> section was being
     205developed.</para></listitem>
    206206
    207207<listitem><para><emphasis>Billy O'Connor</emphasis> for building GNOME
  • postlfs/config/bootdisk.xml

    rc4f1401 r78b3cd61  
    6666<para>You should make a custom kernel that includes only those features
    6767needed to rescue your system, so it will have the least size.  No
    68 sense in building in support for things like <command>xfree86</command>,
    69 <command>dri</command>, etc, as most rescues are performed from the
    70 command prompt.  Along the same lines, if you have GCC-2.95.*, it is
    71 known to produce smaller kernels.  So you might want to use that
     68sense in building in support for things like <application>xfree86</application>,
     69<application>dri</application>, etc, as most rescues are performed from the
     70command prompt.  Along the same lines, if you have <xref linkend="gcc2"/>, it
     71is known to produce smaller kernels.  So you might want to use that
    7272compiler for this kernel.  If you do so, don't overlook any loadable
    7373modules (which are not addressed here) you might need - they need to be
     
    8484components shown in this document, you will need a kernel that is 643 or
    8585fewer blocks in size.  If you want the optional programs - a very basic
    86 editor, like ed, and rudimentary disk partitioning, like sfdisk - the
    87 kernel will need to be 595 or fewer blocks in size.  This should not be
    88 a major problem unless your needs are fairly esoteric.  On the system
    89 used to develop this version of the procedures, using only ext2 file
    90 systems and not using networking or CDs for recovery, the kernel image
    91 is only 481 blocks.  And there may be more to gain - it has not been
    92 closely examined for additional gains.</para>
     86editor, like <command>ed</command>, and rudimentary disk partitioning, like
     87<command>sfdisk</command> - the kernel will need to be 595 or fewer blocks in
     88size.  This should not be a major problem unless your needs are fairly
     89esoteric.  On the system used to develop this version of the procedures, using
     90only ext2 file systems and not using networking or <acronym>CD</acronym>s for
     91recovery, the kernel image is only 481 blocks.  And there may be more to gain - it has not been closely examined for additional gains.</para>
    9392
    9493<para>This kernel image will be called "rescueimage" hereinafter. You
     
    134133system</emphasis></para>
    135134
    136 <screen><userinput><command>mkdir -p /mnt/loop1</command>
    137 <command>dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/rfloppy bs=1k count=4096</command></userinput></screen>
     135<screen><userinput><command>mkdir -p /mnt/loop1
     136dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/rfloppy bs=1k count=4096</command></userinput></screen>
    138137
    139138<para><emphasis>Command explanations</emphasis></para>
     
    163162that you can use if you don't have either of these situations.</para>
    164163
    165 <screen><userinput><command>losetup /dev/loop1 /tmp/rfloppy</command>
    166 <command>mke2fs -m 0 -N 504 /dev/loop1</command>
    167 <command>mount -t ext2 /dev/loop1 /mnt/loop1</command></userinput></screen>
     164<screen><userinput><command>losetup /dev/loop1 /tmp/rfloppy
     165mke2fs -m 0 -N 504 /dev/loop1
     166mount -t ext2 /dev/loop1 /mnt/loop1</command></userinput></screen>
    168167
    169168<para><emphasis>Command explanations</emphasis></para>
     
    190189by these next two commands.</para>
    191190
    192 <screen><userinput><command>mke2fs -F -m 0 -N 504 /tmp/rfloppy</command>
    193 <command>mount -o loop /tmp/rfloppy /mnt/loop1</command></userinput></screen>
     191<screen><userinput><command>mke2fs -F -m 0 -N 504 /tmp/rfloppy
     192mount -o loop /tmp/rfloppy /mnt/loop1</command></userinput></screen>
    194193
    195194<para><emphasis>Command explanations</emphasis></para>
     
    220219<para>First, to have as much free space as possible, remove the
    221220<filename>lost+found</filename> directory, which is not needed because
    222 it is only used by fsck.  Since fsck will never be run on this file
    223 system, it is unneeded.
     221it is only used by <command>fsck</command>.  Since <command>fsck</command>
     222will never be run on this file system, it is unneeded.
    224223
    225224<screen><userinput><command>rmdir /mnt/loop1/lost+found/</command></userinput></screen></para>
     
    323322/sbin/devfsd /dev</userinput></screen>
    324323
    325 <para>If you don't use devfsd, but created a static /dev/directory
    326 using <command>MAKEDEV</command>, or any similar process, the
     324<para>If you don't use devfsd, but created a static <filename>/dev</filename>
     325directory using <command>MAKEDEV</command>, or any similar process, the
    327326<filename>rcS</filename> script will do slightly different things.
    328327Also, don't forget that it is creating the
     
    442441it is not what is considered to be "user friendly".  But the
    443442<command>fdisk</command> and <command>cfdisk</command> programs are
    444 substantially larger or require more shared objects, like ncurses.</para>
     443substantially larger or require more shared objects, like <application>ncurses
     444</application>.</para>
    445445
    446446<para>The second utility is an editor.  Most graphical editors are
     
    473473strip -p --strip-unneeded --remove-section=.comment \
    474474    -o /mnt/loop1/bin/ed /bin/ed
    475 chmod 555 /mnt/loop1/sbin/sfdisk /mnt/loop1/bin/ed
    476 </command></userinput></screen>
     475chmod 555 /mnt/loop1/sbin/sfdisk /mnt/loop1/bin/ed</command></userinput></screen>
    477476
    478477<para>Also, keeping in mind your space limitations, copy any other
     
    500499strip -p --strip-unneeded --remove-section=.comment \
    501500&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;-o /mnt/loop1/lib/libdl.so.2 /lib/libdl-2.3.2.so &amp;&amp;
    502 chmod 555 /mnt/loop1/lib/{libc.so.6,ld-linux.so.2,libdl.so.2}
    503 </command></userinput></screen> 
     501chmod 555 /mnt/loop1/lib/{libc.so.6,ld-linux.so.2,libdl.so.2}</command></userinput></screen> 
    504502
    505503<para>Note that the above commands change the names of the libraries,
     
    511509
    512510<para>Unmount the loopback file.  If you used <command>mount</command>'s
    513 <command>-o loop</command> option, the "bond" between the loop device
     511<userinput>-o loop</userinput> option, the "bond" between the loop device
    514512and the file will be removed when the unmount is done.  Just omit the
    515513<command>losetup -d /dev/loop1</command> from the following
     
    521519losetup -d /dev/loop1 &amp;&amp;  # Omit if mount's -o loop was used
    522520gzip -9 &lt; /tmp/rfloppy &gt; /tmp/rootfs.gz
    523 ls -l /tmp/rootfs.gz
    524 </command></userinput></screen> 
     521ls -l /tmp/rootfs.gz</command></userinput></screen> 
    525522
    526523<para><emphasis>Join a kernel image and initrd onto a diskette</emphasis></para>
     
    539536<filename>/dev/fd0</filename> instead of the /dev/floppy/0.</para>
    540537
    541 <screen><userinput><command>dd if=rescueimage of=/dev/floppy/0 bs=1k</command>
    542 <command>rdev /dev/floppy/0 0,0
     538<screen><userinput><command>dd if=rescueimage of=/dev/floppy/0 bs=1k
     539rdev /dev/floppy/0 0,0
    543540rdev -R /dev/floppy/0 0</command></userinput></screen>
    544541
     
    548545the kernel will use when it boots. Because it loads an initrd, it will
    549546automatically set that as the root device, initially. So, the
    550 <command>0,0</command> gives it "no value", telling the kernel to not
     547<userinput>0,0</userinput> gives it "no value", telling the kernel to not
    551548mount any other device. Some folks give <filename>/dev/fd0</filename> or
    552549something similar. But this has effect <emphasis>only</emphasis> when
  • postlfs/config/compressdoc.xml

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    33<title>Compressing man and info pages</title>
    44
    5 <para>Man and info reader programs can transparently process gzipped or
    6 bziptwoed pages, a feature you can use to free some disk space while keeping
     5<para>Man and info reader programs can transparently process gzip'ed or
     6bzip2'ed pages, a feature you can use to free some disk space while keeping
    77your documentation available. However, things are not that simple: man
    88directories tend to contain links - hard and symbolic - which defeat simple
    9 ideas like recursively calling gzip on them. A better way to go is to use the
    10 script below.
     9ideas like recursively calling <command>gzip</command> on them. A better way
     10to go is to use the script below.
    1111</para>
    1212
     
    140140
    141141<para>Now, as root, you can issue a
    142 <userinput><command>/usr/bin/compressdoc /usr/man bz2</command></userinput>
     142<command>/usr/bin/compressdoc /usr/man bz2</command>
    143143to compress your system man pages. Similarly, you can run it on the
    144144<filename class="directory">/usr/info</filename> directory. Don't forget
  • postlfs/config/inputrc.xml

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    1 <sect1 id="postlfs-config-inputrc">
     1<sect1 id="postlfs-config-inputrc" xreflabel="/etc/inputrc">
    22<?dbhtml filename="inputrc.html" dir="postlfs"?>
    33<title>/etc/inputrc</title>
  • postlfs/config/profile.xml

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    1 <sect1 id="postlfs-config-profile">
     1<sect1 id="postlfs-config-profile" xreflabel="The Bash Shell Startup Files">
    22<?dbhtml filename="profile.html" dir="postlfs"?>
    33<title>The Bash Shell Startup Files</title>
  • postlfs/config/skel.xml

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    55<para>Together, the <command>/usr/sbin/useradd</command> command and
    66<filename>/etc/skel</filename> directory (both are easy to setup and use)
    7 provide a way to assure new users are added on your
    8 <acronym>LFS</acronym> system with the
    9 same beginning settings for things like <envar>PATH</envar>, keyboard processing and
    10 environmental variables.  Using these two facilities makes it easier to
    11 assure this initial state for each new user.
    12 </para>
     7provide a way to assure new users are added on your <acronym>LFS</acronym>
     8system with the same beginning settings for things like <envar>PATH</envar>,
     9keyboard processing and environmental variables.  Using these two facilities
     10makes it easier to assure this initial state for each new user.</para>
    1311
    14 <para>
    15 The <filename>/etc/skel</filename> directory holds copies of various
     12<para>The <filename>/etc/skel</filename> directory holds copies of various
    1613initialization and other files that may be copied to the new user's home
    17 directory when the <command>/usr/sbin/useradd</command>
    18 program adds the new user.</para>
     14directory when the <command>/usr/sbin/useradd</command> program adds the new
     15user.</para>
    1916
    20 <para>Useradd</para>
     17<para><emphasis>Useradd<</emphasis></para>
    2118
    2219<para>The <command>useradd</command> program uses a collection of
    2320default values kept in <filename>/etc/default/useradd</filename>,
    2421if it exists.  If the file does not exist, then it uses some internal
    25 defaults.  You can see the default values by running
    26 <userinput><command>/usr/sbin/useradd -D</command></userinput>.
    27 </para>
     22defaults.  You can see the default values by running <command>/usr/sbin/useradd
     23-D</command>.</para>
    2824
    29 <para>To change these values to something new, create a base
    30 <filename>/etc/default/useradd</filename> file with the same values as
    31 the output of <userinput><command>/usr/sbin/useradd -D</command></userinput>.  Here is a
    32 sample.</para>
     25<para>To change these values to something new, create a base <filename>
     26/etc/default/useradd</filename> file with the same values as the output of
     27<command>/usr/sbin/useradd -D</command>.  Here is a sample.</para>
    3328
    3429<screen># Begin /etc/default/useradd
     
    4843<screen><userinput><command>/usr/sbin/useradd -D -s/bin/bash</command></userinput></screen>
    4944
    50 <para>This will set the <envar>SHELL</envar>= line to
     45<para>This will set the <envar>SHELL</envar>= line to 
    5146<envar>SHELL</envar>=/bin/bash.</para>
    5247
    5348<para><command>Useradd</command> has many parameters that
    54 can be set in the <filename>/etc/default/useradd</filename> file.
    55 </para>
     49can be set in the <filename>/etc/default/useradd</filename> file.</para>
    5650
    5751<para>For more information see <command>man useradd</command>.</para>
    5852
    59 <para>/etc/skel</para>
     53<para><emphasis><filename>/etc/skel</filename></emphasis></para>
    6054
    6155<para>To get started create an <filename>/etc/skel</filename> directory
     
    7064
    7165<para>You can also put other files in <filename>/etc/skel</filename> and
    72 different permissions may be needed for them.
    73 </para>
     66different permissions may be needed for them.</para>
    7467
    75 <para>
    76 Decide which initialization files should be provided in every (or most)
     68<para>Decide which initialization files should be provided in every (or most)
    7769new user's home directory. The decisions you make will affect what you
    78 do in the next three sections, "/etc/inputrc", "The Bash Shell Startup
    79 Files" and "/etc/vimrc, ~/.vimrc". Some or all of those files will be
     70do in the next three sections, <xref linkend="postlfs-config-inputrc"/>,
     71<xref linkend="postlfs-config-profile"/> and
     72<xref linkend="postlfs-config-vimrc"/>. Some or all of those files will be
    8073useful for root, any already-existing users, and new users.</para>
    8174
     
    10093of any other user already in the system.</para>
    10194
    102 <para>When Adding a User</para>
     95<para><emphasis>When Adding a User</emphasis></para>
    10396
    104 <para>When adding a new user with <filename>useradd</filename> use
     97<para>When adding a new user with <command>useradd</command> use
    10598the <userinput>-m</userinput> parameter, which tells
    106 <filename>useradd</filename> to create the user's home directory and
     99<command>useradd</command> to create the user's home directory and
    107100copy files from <filename>/etc/skel</filename> (can be overridden) to
    108101the new user's home directory.  For example:</para>
  • postlfs/config/vimrc.xml

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    1 <sect1 id="postlfs-config-vimrc">
     1<sect1 id="postlfs-config-vimrc" xreflabel="/etc/vimrc, ~/.vimrc">
    22<?dbhtml filename="vimrc.html" dir="postlfs"?>
    33<title>/etc/vimrc, ~/.vimrc</title>
    44
    5 <para>The LFS book installs vim as its editor.  At this point we should
     5<para>The <acronym>LFS</acronym> book installs
     6<application>vim</application> as its editor.  At this point we should
    67state that there are a <emphasis>lot</emphasis> of different editors out
    7 there including emacs, nano, joe and many more.  Anyone who has been
    8 around the Internet (especially usenet) for a short time will certainly
    9 have observed at least one flame war, usually involving vim and emacs
    10 users!</para>
     8there including <application>emacs</application>,
     9<application>nano</application>, <application>joe</application> and many
     10more.  Anyone who has been around the Internet (especially usenet) for a
     11short time will certainly have observed at least one flame war, usually
     12involving <application>vim</application> and
     13<application>emacs</application> users!</para>
    1114
    12 <para>The LFS book gives a basic <filename>vimrc</filename> file.  Here,
    13 we attempt to enhance this file.  At startup, vim reads
    14 <filename>/etc/vimrc</filename> and <filename>~/.vimrc</filename>
    15 (i.e., the global vimrc and the user-specific one.).  Note that this is
    16 only true if you compiled vim using LFS-3.1 onwards.  Prior to this,
    17 the global vimrc was <filename>/usr/share/vim/vimrc</filename>.</para>
     15<para>The <acronym>LFS</acronym> book gives a basic <filename>vimrc
     16</filename> file.  Here, we attempt to enhance this file.  At startup,
     17<command>vim</command> reads <filename>/etc/vimrc</filename> and
     18<filename>~/.vimrc</filename> (i.e., the global
     19<filename>vimrc</filename> and the user-specific one.).  Note that this is
     20only true if you compiled <application>vim</application> using
     21<acronym>LFS</acronym>-3.1 onwards.  Prior to this,
     22the global <filename>vimrc</filename> was <filename>/usr/share/vim/vimrc
     23</filename>.</para>
    1824
    19 <para>Here is a slightly expanded vimrc that you can put in
    20 <filename>/etc/vimrc</filename> to provide global effect. Of course, if
     25<para>Here is a slightly expanded <filename>vimrc</filename> that you can
     26put in <filename>/etc/vimrc</filename> to provide global effect. Of course, if
    2127you put it into <filename>/etc/skel/.vimrc</filename> instead, it will
    2228be made available to users you add to the system later. You can also copy
     
    4147" End .vimrc</screen></para>
    4248
    43 <para>A FAQ on the lfs lists regards the comment tags in vimrc.  Note
    44 that they are " instead of the more usual # or //.  This is correct, the
    45 syntax for vimrc is slightly unusual.</para>
     49<para>A <acronym>FAQ</acronym> on the lfs mailing lists regards the
     50comment tags in <filename>vimrc</filename>.  Note that they are " instead
     51of the more usual # or //.  This is correct, the syntax for <filename>vimrc
     52</filename> is slightly unusual.</para>
    4653
    4754<para>We'll run through a quick explanation of what each of the
    4855options in this example file means here:</para>
    4956<itemizedlist>
    50 <listitem><para><userinput>set nocompatible</userinput> : This option stops vim from behaving in a strongly vi-compatible way.  It
    51 should be at the start of any vimrc file as it can affect lots of other
    52 options which you may want to override.</para></listitem>
     57<listitem><para><userinput>set nocompatible</userinput> : This option
     58stops <command>vim</command> from behaving in a strongly <command>vi
     59</command>-compatible way.  It should be at the start of any <filename>vimrc
     60</filename> file as it can affect lots of other options which you may want to
     61override.</para></listitem>
    5362
    54 <listitem><para><userinput>set bs=2</userinput> : This influences the behavior of the backspace option.  It is fairly
    55 complex so see <userinput>:help 'bs'</userinput> for more
    56 details.</para></listitem>
     63<listitem><para><userinput>set bs=2</userinput> : This influences the behavior
     64of the backspace option.  It is fairly complex so see <userinput>:help 'bs'
     65</userinput> for more details.</para></listitem>
    5766
    58 <listitem><para><userinput>set columns=80</userinput> : This simply sets the number of columns used on the
    59 screen.</para></listitem>
     67<listitem><para><userinput>set columns=80</userinput> : This simply sets the
     68number of columns used on the screen.</para></listitem>
    6069
    61 <listitem><para><userinput>set background=dark</userinput> : This tells vim to use colors which look good on a dark
     70<listitem><para><userinput>set background=dark</userinput> : This tells
     71<command>vim</command> to use colors which look good on a dark
    6272background.</para></listitem>
    6373
    64 <listitem><para><userinput>set tabstop=8</userinput> : The number of spaces which a tabstop takes.</para></listitem>
     74<listitem><para><userinput>set tabstop=8</userinput> : The number of spaces
     75which a tabstop takes.</para></listitem>
    6576
    66 <listitem><para><userinput>set wrapmargin=8</userinput> : This is the number of characters from the right window
    67 border where wrapping starts.</para></listitem>
     77<listitem><para><userinput>set wrapmargin=8</userinput> : This is the number of
     78characters from the right window  border where wrapping starts.</para>
     79</listitem>
    6880
    69 <listitem><para><userinput>set nobk</userinput> : This stops vim from creating a backup before
    70 overwriting a file.</para></listitem>
     81<listitem><para><userinput>set nobk</userinput> : This stops <command>vim
     82</command> from creating a backup before overwriting a file.</para></listitem>
    7183
    72 <listitem><para><userinput>syntax on</userinput> : Enables vim's syntax highlighting.</para></listitem>
     84<listitem><para><userinput>syntax on</userinput> : Enables
     85<command>vim</command>'s syntax highlighting.</para></listitem>
    7386
    74 <listitem><para><userinput>set ruler</userinput> : This makes vim show the current row and column at the bottom right of
     87<listitem><para><userinput>set ruler</userinput> : This makes <command>vim
     88</command> show the current row and column at the bottom right of
    7589the screen.</para></listitem>
    7690
    77 <listitem><para><userinput>set noexpandtab</userinput> : This makes vim insert tabs as tab characters instead of as a set of
     91<listitem><para><userinput>set noexpandtab</userinput> : This makes
     92<command>vim</command> insert tabs as tab characters instead of as a set of
    7893spaces.</para></listitem>
    7994
    8095</itemizedlist>
    8196
    82 <para>More information on the <emphasis>many</emphasis> vim options
    83 can be found by reading the help inside vim itself.  Do this by typing
    84 <userinput>:help</userinput> in vim to get the general help, or by
    85 typing <userinput>:help usr_toc.txt</userinput> to view the User Manual
    86 Table of Contents.</para>
     97<para>More information on the <emphasis>many</emphasis> <command>vim</command>
     98options can be found by reading the help inside <command>vim</command> itself. 
     99Do this by typing <command>:</command><userinput>help</userinput> in
     100<command>vim</command> to get the general help, or by typing <command>:
     101</command><userinput>help usr_toc.txt</userinput> to view
     102the User Manual Table of Contents.</para>
    87103
    88104</sect1>
  • preface/organization.xml

    rc4f1401 r78b3cd61  
    3232<sect2><title>Part VI - Server Networking</title>
    3333<para>Here we deal with setting up mail and other servers (such as
    34 <application>SSH</application>, <application>CVS</application>, etc.).</para></sect2>
     34<application><acronym>SSH</acronym></application>, <application><acronym>CVS
     35</acronym></application>, etc.).</para></sect2>
    3536
    3637<sect2><title>Part VII - Content Serving</title>
     
    5960<sect2><title>Part XII - Multimedia</title>
    6061<para>Here we cover setting multimedia libraries and drivers along with some
    61 audio, video and CD-writing programs.</para></sect2>
     62audio, video and <acronym>CD</acronym>-writing programs.</para></sect2>
    6263
    6364<sect2><title>Part XIII - Printing, Scanning and Typesetting</title>
    6465<para>The <acronym>PST</acronym> part of the book covers things from
    65 <application>ghostscript</application>, <application>CUPS</application>
    66 and <application>DocBook</application>
     66<application>ghostscript</application>, <application><acronym>CUPS</acronym>
     67</application> and <application>DocBook</application>
    6768to installing <application>TeX</application>.</para></sect2>
    6869
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