Changeset acfc391


Ignore:
Timestamp:
09/12/2003 03:09:56 AM (18 years ago)
Author:
Larry Lawrence <larry@…>
Branches:
10.0, 10.1, 11.0, 6.0, 6.1, 6.2, 6.2.0, 6.2.0-rc1, 6.2.0-rc2, 6.3, 6.3-rc1, 6.3-rc2, 6.3-rc3, 7.10, 7.4, 7.5, 7.6, 7.6-blfs, 7.6-systemd, 7.7, 7.8, 7.9, 8.0, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 9.0, 9.1, basic, bdubbs/svn, elogind, gnome, kde5-13430, kde5-14269, kde5-14686, krejzi/svn, nosym, perl-modules, qt5new, systemd-11177, systemd-13485, trunk, v5_0, v5_0-pre1, v5_1, v5_1-pre1, xry111/git-date, xry111/git-date-for-trunk, xry111/git-date-test
Children:
7891efc
Parents:
1aacd4b5
Message:

Part I review with modification to better match LFS

git-svn-id: svn://svn.linuxfromscratch.org/BLFS/trunk/BOOK@1048 af4574ff-66df-0310-9fd7-8a98e5e911e0

Files:
19 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • appendices/appendices.xml

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    1 <part id="appendices">
     1<part id="appendices" xreflabel="Appendix">
    22<title>Appendices</title>
    33
  • book/book.ent

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    2121<!ENTITY ffile-root "ftp://ftp.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs-patches/cvs">
    2222<!ENTITY hfile-root "http://downloads.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs-patches">
    23 <!ENTITY hints-root "http://hints.linuxfromscratch.org">
     23<!ENTITY hints-root "http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/hints">
    2424<!ENTITY nbsp " ">
    2525<!ENTITY publisher "Unknown">
  • introduction/important/beyond.xml

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    11<sect1 id="intro-important-beyond">
    22<?dbhtml filename="beyond.html" dir="introduction"?>
    3 <title>Going Beyond BLFS</title>
     3<title>Going Beyond <acronym>BLFS</acronym></title>
    44
    55<para>The packages that are installed in this book are only the tip of the
    6 iceberg. We hope that the experience you gained with the LFS book and the BLFS
    7 book will give you the background needed to compile, install and configure
    8 packages that are not included in this book.</para>
     6iceberg. We hope that the experience you gained with the <acronym>LFS</acronym>
     7book and the <acronym>BLFS</acronym> book will give you the background needed
     8to compile, install and configure packages that are not included in this book.
     9</para>
    910
    1011<para>If you are in search of a package that is not in the book, the following
     
    2021lead to the website for the package.</para></listitem>
    2122
    22 <listitem><para>If you know the name of the executable, but not the package that
    23 the executable belongs to, first try a google
    24 search with the name of the executable. If the results are overwhelming, try
    25 searching for the given executable in the debian repository at
     23<listitem><para>If you know the name of the executable, but not the package
     24that the executable belongs to, first try a google search with the name of the
     25executable. If the results are overwhelming, try searching for the given
     26executable in the debian repository at
    2627<ulink url="http://www.debian.org/distrib/packages#search_contents"/>.
    2728</para></listitem>
     
    3536<listitem><para>Many of the newer packages follow the <command>./configure
    3637&amp;&amp; make &amp;&amp; make install</command> <emphasis>dance</emphasis>
    37 routine. Help on the
    38 options accepted by configure can be obtained via the command
    39 <command>./configure --help</command>.</para></listitem>
     38routine. Help on the options accepted by configure can be obtained via the
     39command <command>./configure --help</command>.</para></listitem>
    4040
    4141<listitem><para>Most of the packages contain documentation on compiling and
     
    5151</itemizedlist>
    5252
    53 <tip><para>If you have found a package that is only available in .deb or .rpm format,
    54 there are two small scripts rpm2targz and deb2targz that are available at
    55 <ulink url="http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/~tushar/downloads/"/> to convert
     53<tip><para>If you have found a package that is only available in .deb or .rpm
     54format, there are two small scripts rpm2targz and deb2targz that are available
     55at <ulink url="http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/~tushar/downloads/"/> to convert
    5656the archives into a simple tar.gz format.</para></tip>
    5757
  • introduction/important/bootscripts.xml

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    55<para>The scripts included for packages such as <xref linkend="gpm"/>
    66and <xref linkend="alsa"/> are based around the template supplied with
    7 the lfs-bootscripts package from version 3.2 and later of the LFS book.
    8 Note that this is lfs-bootscripts-1.6 and later (the old numbering
    9 changed as of LFS-3.2).  The scripts won't work with versions of LFS
    10 before 3.2 because of a change in their organization with the new
    11 scripts.  However, it should be trivial to adapt the scripts if needed
    12 for older LFS versions.</para>
     7the lfs-bootscripts package from version 3.2 and later of the <acronym>
     8LFS</acronym> book. Note that this is lfs-bootscripts-1.6 and later (the old
     9numbering changed as of LFS-3.2).  The scripts won't work with versions
     10of <acronym>LFS</acronym> before 3.2 because of a change in their organization
     11with the new scripts.  However, it should be trivial to adapt the scripts if
     12needed for older <acronym>LFS</acronym> versions.</para>
    1313
    1414</sect1>
  • introduction/important/position.xml

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    33<title>The /usr versus /usr/local debate</title>
    44
    5 <para><emphasis>Should I install XXX in /usr or
    6 /usr/local?</emphasis></para>
     5<para><emphasis>Should I install XXX in <filename>/usr</filename> or
     6<filename>/usr/local</filename>?</emphasis></para>
    77
    8 <para>This is a question without an obvious answer for an LFS based
    9 system.</para>
     8<para>This is a question without an obvious answer for an
     9<acronym>LFS</acronym> based system.</para>
    1010
    1111<para>In traditional unix systems, <filename>/usr</filename> usually
    12 contains files that come
    13 with the system distribution, and the <filename>/usr/local</filename> tree
    14 is free for the local administrator to add things to.  The only
    15 really hard and fast
    16 rule is that unix distributions should not touch
    17 <filename>/usr/local</filename>, except
    18 perhaps for creating the basic directories within it.</para>
     12contains files that come with the system distribution, and the <filename>
     13/usr/local</filename> tree is free for the local administrator to add things
     14to.  The only really hard and fast rule is that unix distributions should not
     15touch <filename>/usr/local</filename>, except perhaps for creating the basic
     16directories within it.</para>
    1917
    2018<para>With Linux distributions, like Red Hat, Debian etc. a possible rule is
     
    2422<filename>/usr</filename>.</para>
    2523
    26 <para>LFS users build their own system and so deciding where the system ends
    27 and local files begin is not straightforward.  So the choice should be
    28 made in order to make things easier to administer.  There are several
     24<para><acronym>LFS</acronym> users build their own system and so deciding where
     25the system ends and local files begin is not straightforward.  So the choice
     26should be made in order to make things easier to administer.  There are several
    2927reasons for dividing files between <filename>/usr</filename> and
    3028<filename>/usr/local</filename>.</para>
     
    3230<itemizedlist>
    3331
    34 <listitem><para>On a network of several machines all running LFS, or mixed
    35 LFS and
    36 other Linux distributions, <filename>/usr/local</filename> could be used to
    37 hold packages
     32<listitem><para>On a network of several machines all running <acronym>LFS
     33</acronym>, or mixed <acronym>LFS</acronym> and other Linux distributions,
     34<filename>/usr/local</filename> could be used to hold packages
    3835that are common between all the computers in the network.  It can be
    39 NFS mounted or mirrored from a single server.  Here local indicates
    40 local to the site.</para></listitem>
     36<acronym>NFS</acronym> mounted or mirrored from a single server.  Here local
     37indicates local to the site.</para></listitem>
    4138
    4239<listitem><para>On a network of several computers all running an identical
    43 LFS system <filename>/usr/local</filename> could hold packages that
    44 are different between the machines.  In this case local refers to
    45 the individual computers.</para></listitem>
     40<acronym>LFS</acronym> system <filename>/usr/local</filename> could hold
     41packages that are different between the machines.  In this case local refers
     42to the individual computers.</para></listitem>
    4643
    4744<listitem><para>Even on a single computer <filename>/usr/local</filename> can
    4845be useful if you have several distributions installed simultaneously, and want
    49 a place to put packages that will be the same on all of
    50 them.</para></listitem>
     46a place to put packages that will be the same on all of them.</para></listitem>
    5147
    52 <listitem><para>Or you might regularly rebuild your LFS, but want
    53 a place to put files
    54 that you don't want to rebuild each time.  This way you can wipe the
    55 LFS filesystem and start from a clean partition every time without losing
    56 everything.</para></listitem>
     48<listitem><para>Or you might regularly rebuild your <acronym>LFS</acronym>, but
     49want a place to put files that you don't want to rebuild each time.  This way
     50you can wipe the <acronym>LFS</acronym> filesystem and start from a clean
     51partition every time without losing everything.</para></listitem>
    5752
    5853</itemizedlist>
    5954
    60 <para>Some people ask why not use your own directory tree, e.g.
    61 <filename>/usr/site</filename> rather than
    62 <filename>/usr/local</filename>?</para>
     55<para>Some people ask why not use your own directory tree, e.g. <filename>
     56/usr/site</filename> rather than <filename>/usr/local</filename>?</para>
    6357
    64 <para>There is nothing stopping you, many sites do make their own trees, however
    65 it makes installing new software more difficult.  Automatic installers
     58<para>There is nothing stopping you, many sites do make their own trees,
     59however it makes installing new software more difficult.  Automatic installers
    6660often look for dependencies in <filename>/usr</filename> and
    6761<filename>/usr/local</filename>, and if the file it is looking
    6862for is in <filename>/usr/site</filename> instead, the installer will
    69 probably fail unless
    70 you specifically tell it where to look.</para>
     63probably fail unless you specifically tell it where to look.</para>
    7164
    72 <para><emphasis>What is the BLFS position on this?</emphasis></para>
     65<para><emphasis>What is the <acronym>BLFS</acronym> position on this?</emphasis>
     66</para>
    7367
    74 <para>All of the BLFS instructions install programs in
     68<para>All of the <acronym>BLFS</acronym> instructions install programs in
    7569<filename>/usr</filename> unless specifically stated otherwise.  There
    7670are examples where some files are placed in the
    7771<filename>/usr/local</filename> hierarchy but these are documented and
    7872are generally for a good reason. These exceptions should be well documented
    79 in the book.  If you think you have
    80 found one which isn't please tell us!</para>
     73in the book.  If you think you have found one which isn't please tell us!</para>
    8174
    8275</sect1>
  • introduction/important/unpacking.xml

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    33<title>Getting and unpacking the software</title>
    44
    5 <para>Those people who have built a LFS system will be aware of the
    6 general principles of downloading and unpacking software.  We will
     5<para>Those people who have built a <acronym>LFS</acronym> system will be aware
     6of the general principles of downloading and unpacking software.  We will
    77however repeat some of that information here for those new to building
    88their own software.</para>
    99
    10 <para>One difference from the LFS book is that we do <emphasis>not</emphasis>
    11 mirror the packages on the BLFS website.
    12 Instead, each set of installation instructions contains a URL from which
    13 you can download the package.  We do however keep a selection of patches
    14 available via http/ftp.  These are referenced as needed in the
     10<para>Each set of installation instructions contains a <acronym>URL</acronym>
     11from which you can download the package.  We do however keep a selection of
     12patches available via http.  These are referenced as needed in the
    1513installation instructions.</para>
    1614
     
    3230the following two commands, depending on the filename:</para>
    3331
    34 <screen><userinput>tar -xvzf filename.tar.gz
     32<screen><command>tar -xvzf filename.tar.gz
    3533tar -xvzf filename.tgz
    36 tar -xvzf filename.tar.Z</userinput></screen>
     34tar -xvzf filename.tar.Z</command></screen>
    3735
    3836<para>If a file is tar'ed and bzip2'ed, it can usually be unpacked by
    3937running:</para>
    4038
    41 <screen><userinput>tar -jxvf filename.tar.bz2</userinput></screen>
     39<screen><command>tar -jxvf filename.tar.bz2</command></screen>
    4240
    43 <para>This applies as long as you patched tar to include the j option
    44 during your LFS install.  If you didn't, you can use a slightly
    45 different method:</para>
     41<para>You can also use a slightly different method:</para>
    4642
    47 <screen><userinput>bzcat filename.tar.bz2 | tar -xv</userinput></screen>
     43<screen><command>bzcat filename.tar.bz2 | tar -xv</command></screen>
    4844
    4945<para>Finally, you need to be able to unpack patches which are generally
     
    5248commands depending on whether the file is .gz or .bz2:</para>
    5349
    54 <screen><userinput>gunzip patchname.gz
    55 bunzip2 patchname.bz2</userinput></screen>
     50<screen><command>gunzip patchname.gz
     51bunzip2 patchname.bz2</command></screen>
    5652
    5753</sect2>
  • introduction/welcome/acknowledgments.xml

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    44
    55<para>We would like to thank the following people and organizations for their
    6 contributions toward the BLFS and LFS projects:</para>
     6contributions toward the <acronym>BLFS</acronym> and <acronym>LFS</acronym>
     7projects:</para>
    78
    89<itemizedlist>
     
    1920<listitem><para><ulink url="mailto:gerard@linuxfromscratch.org">Gerard
    2021Beekmans</ulink> &lt;gerard@linuxfromscratch.org&gt; for starting and
    21 writing the vast majority of the LFS project.</para></listitem>
     22writing the vast majority of the <acronym>LFS</acronym> project.</para>
     23</listitem>
    2224
    2325<listitem><para><ulink url="mailto:highos@linuxfromscratch.org">Jesse
    2426Tie-Ten-Quee</ulink> &lt;highos@linuxfromscratch.org&gt; for answering
    25 many questions on irc, having a great deal of patience and for not
    26 killing the editor for the joke in the original BLFS
    27 announcement!</para></listitem>
     27many questions on <acronym>irc</acronym>, having a great deal of patience and
     28for not killing the former editor for the joke in the original <acronym>BLFS
     29</acronym> announcement!</para></listitem>
    2830
    29 <listitem><para><ulink url="http://www.dreamwvr.com/services">DREAMWVR.COM</ulink> for their ongoing sponsorship by donating various resources to the LFS and
    30 related sub projects.</para></listitem>
     31<listitem><para><ulink url="http://www.dreamwvr.com/services">DREAMWVR.COM
     32</ulink> for their ongoing sponsorship by donating various resources to the
     33<acronym>LFS</acronym> and related sub projects.</para></listitem>
    3134
    3235<listitem><para>Robert Briggs for donating the linuxfromscratch.org and
    3336linuxfromscratch.com domain names.</para></listitem>
    3437
    35 <listitem><para><ulink url="mailto:bkenoah@oswd.org">Frank
    36 Skettino</ulink> &lt;bkenoah@oswd.org&gt; at <ulink
    37 url="http://www.oswd.org">OSWD</ulink> for coming up the initial design
    38 of the LFS and BLFS websites.</para></listitem>
     38<listitem><para><ulink url="mailto:bkenoah@oswd.org">Frank Skettino</ulink>
     39&lt;bkenoah@oswd.org&gt; at <ulink  url="http://www.oswd.org">OSWD</ulink> for
     40coming up the initial design of the <acronym>LFS</acronym> and <acronym>BLFS
     41</acronym> websites.</para></listitem>
    3942
    40 <listitem><para><ulink url="mailto:garrett@linux.com">Garrett
    41 LeSage</ulink> &lt;garrett@linux.com&gt; for creating the LFS
    42 banner</para></listitem>
     43<listitem><para><ulink url="mailto:garrett@linux.com">Garrett LeSage</ulink>
     44&lt;garrett@linux.com&gt; for creating the <acronym>LFS</acronym> banner</para>
     45</listitem>
    4346
    44 <listitem><para>Jeff Bauman (former co-editor of the book) for his
    45 assistance with getting BLFS off the ground.</para></listitem>
     47<listitem><para>Jeff Bauman (former co-editor of the book) for his assistance
     48with getting <acronym>BLFS</acronym> off the ground.</para></listitem>
    4649
    47 <listitem><para>Countless other people on the various LFS and BLFS
    48 mailing lists who are making this book happen by giving their
    49 suggestions, testing the book and submitting bug reports.</para></listitem>
     50<listitem><para>Countless other people on the various <acronym>LFS</acronym>
     51and <acronym>BLFS</acronym> mailing lists who are making this book happen by
     52giving their suggestions, testing the book and submitting bug reports.</para>
     53</listitem>
    5054
    5155</itemizedlist>
  • introduction/welcome/askhelp.xml

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    11<sect1 id="intro-welcome-askhelp">
    22<?dbhtml filename="askhelp.html" dir="introduction"?>
    3 <title>Asking for help and the FAQ</title>
     3<title>Asking for help and the <acronym>FAQ</acronym></title>
    44
    55<para>If you encounter a problem while using this book, and your problem
    6 is not listed in the FAQ (<ulink
    7 url="http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/faq"/>), you will find that most
    8 of the people on Internet Relay Chat (IRC) and
    9 on the mailing lists are willing to help you. An
    10 overview of the LFS mailing lists can be found in
    11 <xref linkend="intro-welcome-maillists"/>. To assist us in diagnosing and solving
    12 your problem, include as much relevant information as possible in your
    13 request for help.</para>
     6is not listed in the <acronym>FAQ</acronym> (<ulink
     7url="http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/faq"/>), you will find that most of the
     8people on Internet Relay Chat (<acronym>IRC</acronym>) and on the mailing lists
     9are willing to help you. An overview of the <acronym>LFS</acronym> mailing
     10lists can be found in <xref linkend="intro-welcome-maillists"/>. To assist us
     11in diagnosing and solving your problem, include as much relevant information as
     12possible in your request for help.</para>
    1413
    1514<sect2>
     
    2322available as a module to the kernel.  If it is a module, is it configured
    2423properly in <filename>modules.conf</filename> and has it been loaded.  You
    25 should use <userinput>lsmod</userinput> to see if it's loaded. Check the
    26 <filename>sys.log</filename> or run <userinput>modprobe
    27 &lt;driver&gt;</userinput>
    28 to review any error message.  If it loads properly, you may need to add
    29 the <userinput>modprobe</userinput> to your boot scripts.</para></listitem>
     24should use <command>lsmod</command> as root to see if it's loaded. Check the
     25<filename>sys.log</filename> or run <command>modprobe &lt;driver&gt;
     26</command> to review any error message.  If it loads properly, you may need
     27to add the <command>modprobe</command> to your boot scripts.</para></listitem>
    3028
    3129<listitem><para>Are your permissions properly set, especially for
    32 devices.  LFS uses groups to make these settings easier, but it also
    33 adds the step of adding users to groups to allow access. A simple
    34 <userinput>moduser -G audio &lt;user&gt;</userinput> may be all that's
    35 necessary for that user to have access to the sound
    36 system.  Any question that starts out with "It works as root, but not as
    37 ..." should review permissions throughly prior to asking.</para></listitem>
     30devices. <acronym>LFS</acronym> uses groups to make these settings easier, but
     31it also adds the step of adding users to groups to allow access. A simple
     32<command>moduser -G audio &lt;user&gt;</command> may be all that's necessary
     33for that user to have access to the sound system.  Any question that starts
     34out with "It works as root, but not as ..." should review permissions throughly
     35prior to asking.</para></listitem>
    3836
    39 <listitem><para>BLFS liberally uses <filename>/opt/&lt;package&gt;</filename>. The main objection to this centers around the need to
    40 expand your environment variables for each package placed there (e.g.
     37<listitem><para><acronym>BLFS</acronym> liberally uses <filename>
     38/opt/&lt;package&gt;</filename>. The main objection to this centers around the
     39need to expand your environment variables for each package placed there (e.g.
    4140PATH=$PATH:/opt/kde/bin).  In some cases, the package will walk you
    42 through the changes, but some will not.  <xref linkend="appendices-generic"/> is available to
    43 help you check.</para></listitem>
     41through the changes, but some will not.  <xref linkend="appendices-generic"/>
     42is available to help you check.</para></listitem>
    4443</itemizedlist></sect2>
    4544
     
    5756<listitem><para>the exact error message or symptom you are
    5857receiving,</para></listitem>
    59 <listitem><para>whether you have deviated from the book or LFS at
    60 all.</para></listitem>
     58<listitem><para>whether you have deviated from the book or
     59<acronym>LFS</acronym> at all.</para></listitem>
    6160</itemizedlist>
    6261
     
    6665<para>Expect guidance instead of specific instructions. If you are
    6766instructed to read something, please do so, it generally implies that
    68 the answer was way too obvious and that the question would not have been asked if a little
    69 research was done prior to asking. The volunteers in the mailing list
    70 prefer not to be used as an alternative to doing reasonable research on
    71 your end.  In addition, the quality of your experience with BLFS is also greatly
    72 enhanced by this research, and the quality of volunteers is enhanced
    73 because they don't feel that their time has been abused, so they are
    74 far more likely to participate.</para>
     67the answer was way too obvious and that the question would not have been asked
     68if a little research was done prior to asking. The volunteers in the mailing
     69list prefer not to be used as an alternative to doing reasonable research on
     70your end.  In addition, the quality of your experience with <acronym>BLFS
     71</acronym> is also greatly enhanced by this research, and the quality of
     72volunteers is enhanced because they don't feel that their time has been abused,
     73so they are far more likely to participate.</para>
    7574
    7675<para>An excellent article on asking for help on the Internet in general
  • introduction/welcome/changelog.xml

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    1 <sect1 id="intro-welcome-changelog">
     1<sect1 id="intro-welcome-changelog" role="dsssl">
    22<?dbhtml filename="changelog.html" dir="introduction"?>
    33<title>Changelog</title>
     
    1111<itemizedlist>
    1212
    13 <listitem><para>September 11th, 2003 [lary]: added imlib2 and
     13<listitem><para>September 11th, 2003 [larry]: Arranged Part
     14I-Introduction to follow LFS order and, of course,
     15tagged.</para></listitem>
     16
     17<listitem><para>September 11th, 2003 [larry]: added imlib2 and
    1418openquicktime submitted by Igor.</para></listitem>
    1519
  • introduction/welcome/contact.xml

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    33<title>Contact information</title>
    44
    5 <para>Please direct your emails to one of the BLFS mailing lists. See
    6 <xref linkend="intro-welcome-maillists"/> for more information on the
    7 available mailing lists.</para>
     5<para>Please direct your emails to one of the <acronym>BLFS</acronym> mailing
     6lists. See <xref linkend="intro-welcome-maillists"/> for more information on
     7the available mailing lists.</para>
    88
    9 <para>The current BLFS maintainer is &maintainer-fullname;.  If you need
    10 to reach &maintainer-firstname;, send an email to
     9<para>The current <acronym>BLFS</acronym> maintainer is &maintainer-fullname;. 
     10If you need to reach &maintainer-firstname;, send an email to
    1111<ulink url="mailto:&maintainer-address;">&maintainer-address;</ulink>.</para>
    1212
  • introduction/welcome/conventions.xml

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    3232websites, etc.</para></blockquote>
    3333
    34 <para><screen><userinput>cat &gt; $LFS/etc/group &lt;&lt; "EOF"</userinput>
     34<screen><userinput><command>cat &gt; $LFS/etc/group &lt;&lt; "EOF"</command>>
    3535        root:x:0:
    3636        bin:x:1:
    3737        ......
    38 <userinput>EOF</userinput></screen></para>
     38<command>EOF</command></userinput></screen>
    3939
    4040<blockquote><para>This type of section is used mainly when creating
  • introduction/welcome/credits.xml

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    33<title>Credits</title>
    44
    5 <para>Many people have contributed both directly and indirectly to BLFS.
    6 This page lists all of those we can think of.  We may well have
     5<para>Many people have contributed both directly and indirectly to <acronym>
     6BLFS</acronym>. This page lists all of those we can think of.  We may well have
    77missed people out and if you feel this is the case, drop us line.  Many
    88thanks to all of the LFS community for their assistance with this
     
    1616<itemizedlist>
    1717
    18 <listitem><para><emphasis>Editor:</emphasis> Larry Lawrence <ulink
    19 url="mailto:&maintainer-address;">&lt;&maintainer-address;&gt;</ulink></para></listitem>
    20 
    21 <listitem><para><emphasis>Co-Editors:</emphasis> Bruce
    22 Dubbs, Mark Hymers, Billy O'Connor and Tushar Teredesai</para></listitem>
     18<listitem><para><emphasis>Editor:</emphasis> Larry Lawrence <ulink
     19url="mailto:&maintainer-address;">&lt;&maintainer-address;&gt;</ulink></para>
     20</listitem>
     21
     22<listitem><para><emphasis>Co-Editors:</emphasis> Bruce Dubbs, Mark Hymers,
     23Billy O'Connor and Tushar Teredesai</para></listitem>
    2324
    2425</itemizedlist>
     
    2930<itemizedlist>
    3031
    31 <listitem><para>Chapter 01.  Based on the LFS introductory text by
    32 <emphasis>Gerard Beekmans</emphasis>, modified by <emphasis>Mark
    33 Hymers</emphasis> for BLFS.</para></listitem>
    34 
    35 <listitem><para>Chapter 02: The /usr versus /usr/local
    36 debate: <emphasis>Andrew McMurry</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    37 
    38 <listitem><para>Chapter 02: Going beyond BLFS: <emphasis>Tushar
    39 Teredesai</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    40 
    41 <listitem><para>Chapter 03: /etc/inputrc: <emphasis>Chris
    42 Lynn</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
     32<listitem><para>Chapter 01.  Based on the LFS introductory text by <emphasis>
     33Gerard Beekmans</emphasis>, modified by <emphasis>Mark Hymers</emphasis>
     34for <acronym>BLFS</acronym>.</para></listitem>
     35
     36<listitem><para>Chapter 02: The /usr versus /usr/local debate: <emphasis>Andrew
     37McMurry</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
     38
     39<listitem><para>Chapter 02: Going beyond BLFS: <emphasis>Tushar Teredesai
     40</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
     41
     42<listitem><para>Chapter 03: /etc/inputrc: <emphasis>Chris Lynn</emphasis>.
     43</para></listitem>
    4344
    4445<listitem><para>Chapter 03: Customizing your logon &amp; vimrc: <emphasis>Mark
    4546Hymers</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    4647
    47 <listitem><para>Chapter 03: Random number script <emphasis>Larry
    48 Lawrence</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
     48<listitem><para>Chapter 03: Random number script <emphasis>Larry Lawrence
     49</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    4950
    5051<listitem><para>Chapter 03: Creating a custom bootdisk <emphasis>Mike
     
    5455Robertson</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    5556
    56 <listitem><para>Chapter 04: <!--<xref
    57 linkend="ch06-firewall"/>-->Firewalling: <emphasis>Henning
    58 Rohde with thanks to Jeff Bauman</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
     57<listitem><para>Chapter 04: <!--<xref linkend="ch06-firewall"/>-->Firewalling:
     58<emphasis>Henning Rohde with thanks to Jeff Bauman</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    5959
    6060<listitem><para>Chapter 11: Which <emphasis>Mark Hymers</emphasis> with
     
    6262Tie-Ten-Quee</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    6363
    64 <listitem><para>Chapter 26: XFree86 <emphasis>Bruce Dubbs</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    65 
    66 <listitem><para>Chapter 28: Intro to Window Managers
    67 <emphasis>Bruce Dubbs</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
     64<listitem><para>Chapter 26: XFree86 <emphasis>Bruce Dubbs</emphasis>.</para>
     65</listitem>
     66
     67<listitem><para>Chapter 28: Intro to Window Managers <emphasis>Bruce Dubbs
     68</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
    6869
    6970<listitem><para>Chapter 29: KDE: <emphasis>Bruce Dubbs</emphasis>.</para>
    7071</listitem>
    7172
    72 <listitem><para>Chapter 32: GNOME: <emphasis>Larry Lawrence</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
     73<listitem><para>Chapter 32: GNOME: <emphasis>Larry Lawrence</emphasis>.</para>
     74</listitem>
    7375
    7476</itemizedlist>
     
    8284xvid and xsane: <emphasis>Alex Kloss</emphasis></para></listitem>
    8385
    84 <listitem><para>AbiWord, at-spi, ATK, audiofile, avifile, bc, bonobo-activation, bug-buddy,
    85 cdrdao, cdrtools, cpio, curl, dhcp, enlightenment, eog, esound,
    86 fcron, fluxbox, FNLIB, gail, galeon, gconf-editor, gdbm, gedit,
    87 gimp, GLib2, gmp, gnet, gnome-applets, gnome-desktop,
    88 gnome-games, gnome-icon-theme, gnome-libs,
    89 gnome-media, gnome-mime-data, gnome-panel, gnome-session,
     86<listitem><para>AbiWord, at-spi, ATK, audiofile, avifile, bc, bonobo-activation,
     87bug-buddy, cdrdao, cdrtools, cpio, curl, dhcp, enlightenment, eog, esound,
     88fcron, fluxbox, FNLIB, gail, galeon, gconf-editor, gdbm, gedit, gimp, GLib2,
     89gmp, gnet, gnome-applets, gnome-desktop, gnome-games, gnome-icon-theme,
     90gnome-libs, gnome-media, gnome-mime-data, gnome-panel, gnome-session,
    9091gnome-system-monitor, gnome-terminal, gnome-themes, gnome-utils, gnome-vfs,
    91 gnome2-user-docs, gnumeric, GTK+2, gtk-doc, gtk-engines,
    92 gtk-thinice-engine, eel, imlib, intltool,
    93 lame, libao, libart_lgpl, libbonobo, libbonoboui, libgail-gnome,
    94 libglade2, libgnome, libgnomecanvas, libgnomeprint, libgnomeprintui,
    95 libgnomeui, libgtkhtml, libgtop, libIDL, libogg, librep, librsvg,
    96 libvorbis, libwnck, libxml2, libxslt, linc, LPRng, Linux_PAM,
     92gnome2-user-docs, gnumeric, GTK+2, gtk-doc, gtk-engines, gtk-thinice-engine,
     93eel, imlib, intltool, lame, libao, libart_lgpl, libbonobo, libbonoboui,
     94libgail-gnome, libglade2, libgnome, libgnomecanvas, libgnomeprint,
     95libgnomeprintui, libgnomeui, libgtkhtml, libgtop, libIDL, libogg, librep,
     96librsvg, libvorbis, libwnck, libxml2, libxslt, linc, LPRng, Linux_PAM,
    9797metacity, MPlayer, mutt, nautilus, nautilus-media, oaf, OpenJade, OpenSP,
    9898OpenSSH, ORBit, ORBit2, pan, Pango, pccts, pcre, pkgconfig, postfix,
    9999procmail, Python, QT, rep-gtk, ruby, sawfish, scrollkeeper, sgml-common,
    100 sgml-dtd, shadow, startup-notification, unzip,
    101 vorbis-tools, vte, wget, XFce, xine, xml-dtd, yelp and zip: <emphasis>Larry Lawrence</emphasis></para></listitem>
     100sgml-dtd, shadow, startup-notification, unzip, vorbis-tools, vte, wget, XFce,
     101xine, xml-dtd, yelp and zip: <emphasis>Larry Lawrence</emphasis></para>
     102</listitem>
    102103
    103104<listitem><para>CDParanoia, mpg123, SDL and XMMS: <emphasis>Jeroen
    104105Coumans</emphasis></para></listitem>
    105106
    106 <listitem><para>alsa, cvs, dhcpcd, gpm, hdparm, libjpeg, libmng, libpng, libtiff, libungif, links, lynx, openssl, tcsh, which, zsch, zlib: <emphasis>Mark Hymers</emphasis></para></listitem>
     107<listitem><para>alsa, cvs, dhcpcd, gpm, hdparm, libjpeg, libmng, libpng,
     108libtiff, libungif, links, lynx, openssl, tcsh, which, zsch, zlib: <emphasis>
     109Mark Hymers</emphasis></para></listitem>
    107110
    108111<listitem><para>daemontools, traceroute and ucspi-tcp: <emphasis>Jeff
    109112Bauman</emphasis></para></listitem>
    110113
    111 <listitem><para>db and lcms: <emphasis>Jeremy Jones and Mark
    112 Hymers</emphasis></para></listitem>
     114<listitem><para>db and lcms: <emphasis>Jeremy Jones and Mark Hymers</emphasis>
     115</para></listitem>
    113116
    114117<listitem><para>aspell, balsa, bind, bonobo, bonobo-conf, cvs server,
     
    117120libesmtp, libfam, libghttp, libglade, pine, portmap, PostgreSQL,
    118121pspell, qmail, qpopper, readline, reiserfs, Samba, sendmail, slib,
    119 slrn, soup, tex, tcp-wrappers, and xinetd: <emphasis>Billy O'Connor</emphasis></para></listitem> 
    120 
    121 <listitem><para>ProFTPD and rsync: <emphasis>Daniel Baumann</emphasis></para></listitem>
    122 
    123 <listitem><para>ESP Ghostscript: <emphasis>Matt Rogers</emphasis></para></listitem>
    124 
    125 <listitem><para>fetchmail and wvdial: <emphasis>Paul
    126 Campbell</emphasis></para></listitem>
    127 
    128 <listitem><para>udftools: <emphasis>Richard
    129 Downing</emphasis></para></listitem>
     122slrn, soup, tex, tcp-wrappers, and xinetd: <emphasis>Billy O'Connor</emphasis>
     123</para></listitem> 
     124
     125<listitem><para>ProFTPD and rsync: <emphasis>Daniel Baumann</emphasis></para>
     126</listitem>
     127
     128<listitem><para>ESP Ghostscript: <emphasis>Matt Rogers</emphasis></para>
     129</listitem>
     130
     131<listitem><para>fetchmail and wvdial: <emphasis>Paul Campbell</emphasis></para>
     132</listitem>
     133
     134<listitem><para>udftools: <emphasis>Richard Downing</emphasis></para></listitem>
    130135
    131136<listitem><para>directFB, libMPEG3, MySQL-4, NASM and SVGAlib: <emphasis>Igor
    132137Zivkovic</emphasis></para></listitem>
    133138
    134 <listitem><para>tripwire : <emphasis>Manfred
    135 Glombowski</emphasis></para></listitem>
    136 
    137 <listitem><para>alsa-oss, inetutils, gdk, GLib, GTK+, libxml and vim: <emphasis>James
    138 Iwanek</emphasis></para></listitem>
    139 
    140 <listitem><para>iptables: <emphasis>Henning
    141 Rohde</emphasis></para></listitem>
     139<listitem><para>tripwire : <emphasis>Manfred Glombowski</emphasis></para>
     140</listitem>
     141
     142<listitem><para>alsa-oss, inetutils, gdk, GLib, GTK+, libxml and vim: <emphasis>
     143James Iwanek</emphasis></para></listitem>
     144
     145<listitem><para>iptables: <emphasis>Henning Rohde</emphasis></para></listitem>
    142146
    143147<listitem><para>joe, nano, nmap, slang, w3m  and whois: <emphasis>Timothy
    144148Bauscher</emphasis></para></listitem>
    145149
    146 <listitem><para>MySQL: <emphasis>Jesse
    147 Tie-Ten-Quee</emphasis></para></listitem>
     150<listitem><para>MySQL: <emphasis>Jesse Tie-Ten-Quee</emphasis></para></listitem>
    148151
    149152<listitem><para>fontconfig, gcc, gcc2, j2sdk, mozilla, nas, openoffice,
    150 STLport, and bind-utils: <emphasis>
    151 Tushar Teredesai</emphasis></para></listitem>
    152 
    153 <listitem><para>ncpfs and RP-PPPoE: <emphasis> DJ Lucas
    154 </emphasis></para></listitem>
     153STLport, and bind-utils: <emphasis>Tushar Teredesai</emphasis></para></listitem>
     154
     155<listitem><para>ncpfs and RP-PPPoE: <emphasis>DJ Lucas</emphasis></para>
     156</listitem>
    155157
    156158</itemizedlist>
     
    163165
    164166<listitem><para><emphasis>Gerard Beekmans</emphasis> for generally
    165 putting up with us and for running the whole LFS project.</para></listitem>
     167putting up with us and for running the whole <acronym>LFS</acronym> project.
     168</para></listitem>
    166169
    167170<listitem><para><emphasis>Bruce Dubbs</emphasis> for writing the kde.txt
     
    175178
    176179<listitem><para><emphasis>Jeremy Jones</emphasis> (otherwise known as
    177 <emphasis>mca</emphasis>) for hacking Makefiles and general
    178 assistance.</para></listitem>
    179 
    180 <listitem><para><emphasis>J_Man</emphasis> for submitting a
    181 gpm-1.19.3.diff file on which our gpm instructions are
    182 based.</para></listitem>
     180<emphasis>mca</emphasis>) for hacking Makefiles and general assistance.</para>
     181</listitem>
     182
     183<listitem><para><emphasis>J_Man</emphasis> for submitting a gpm-1.19.3.diff
     184file on which our gpm instructions are based.</para></listitem>
    183185
    184186<listitem><para><emphasis>Scot Mc Pherson</emphasis> for writing the
    185187gnome-1.4.txt hint from which was gathered useful information and for
    186 warning us that Gnome2 was a toy.</para></listitem>
     188warning us that Gnome Version 2.0 may not be ready to put in the book.</para>
     189</listitem>
    187190
    188191<listitem><para><emphasis>Tushar Teredesai</emphasis> for writing the
    189 Compiling Java 2 SDK from Scratch hint on which j2sdk is
    190 based and for writing the docbook hint used throughout the typesetting
    191 chapter.</para></listitem>
     192Compiling Java 2 SDK from Scratch hint on which j2sdk is based and for writing
     193the docbook hint used throughout the typesetting chapter.</para></listitem>
    192194
    193195<listitem><para><emphasis>Oliver Brakmann</emphasis> for developing the
    194 dhcpcd patch for FHS compliance.</para></listitem>
     196dhcpcd patch for <acronym>FHS</acronym> compliance.</para></listitem>
    195197
    196198<listitem><para><emphasis>DJ Lucas</emphasis> for contributing to dhcpcd
    197 patch and many contributions while dhcp section was being
    198 developed.</para></listitem>
    199 
    200 <listitem><para><emphasis>Billy O'Connor</emphasis> for building gnome2
    201 so many times (I thought my four was a lot) and being very helpful with
    202 his comments on that section.</para></listitem>
    203 
    204 <listitem><para><emphasis>Ted Riley</emphasis> for writing the Linux-PAM
    205 + CrackLib + Shadow hint on which reinstalling shadow to use PAM is
    206 based.</para></listitem>
     199patch and many contributions while dhcp section was being developed.</para>
     200</listitem>
     201
     202<listitem><para><emphasis>Billy O'Connor</emphasis> for building GNOME
     2032.0 so many times and being very helpful with his comments on that section.
     204</para></listitem>
     205
     206<listitem><para><emphasis>Ted Riley</emphasis> for writing the
     207Linux-<acronym>PAM</acronym> + CrackLib + Shadow hint on which reinstalling
     208shadow to use <acronym>PAM</acronym> is based.</para></listitem>
    207209
    208210<listitem><para><emphasis>Fernando Arbeiza</emphasis> for doing great
    209 quality assurance on Shadow utilizing PAM.  The machine access he saved
    210 may have been yours.</para></listitem>
    211 
    212 <listitem><para><emphasis>Jim Harris</emphasis> for writing the
    213 dig-nslookup-host.txt hint on which the bind-utils instructions are based.</para></listitem>
     211quality assurance on Shadow utilizing <acronym>PAM</acronym>.  The machine
     212access he saved may have been yours.</para></listitem>
     213
     214<listitem><para><emphasis>Jim Harris</emphasis> for writing the
     215dig-nslookup-host.txt hint on which the bind-utils instructions are based.
     216</para></listitem>
    214217
    215218</itemizedlist>
  • introduction/welcome/maillists.xml

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    174174
    175175<para>To unsubscribe from a list, send an email
    176 to <ulink url="mailto:listar@linuxfromscratch.org"/> and
    177 write <emphasis>unsubscribe listname</emphasis> as the subject header of
    178 the message.</para>
     176to <ulink url="mailto:listar@linuxfromscratch.org">listar@linuxfromscratch.org
     177</ulink> and write <emphasis>unsubscribe listname</emphasis> as the subject
     178header of the message.</para>
    179179
    180180<para>Multiple lists can be unsubscribed at the same time
  • introduction/welcome/newsserver.xml

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    77will be copied to its correspondent newsgroup, and vice versa.</para>
    88
    9 <para>The news server can be reached at <ulink
     9<para>The news server can be reached at <ulink 
    1010url="news:news.linuxfromscratch.org"/>.</para>
    1111
  • introduction/welcome/version.xml

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    1 <sect1 id="intro-welcome-version" xreflabel="Book Version">
     1<sect1 id="intro-welcome-version" xreflabel="Book Version" role="dsssl">
    22<?dbhtml filename="version.html" dir="introduction"?>
    33<title>Book version</title>
    44
    5 <para>This is BLFS-BOOK version &version; dated &releasedate;. If this
    6 version is older than a month a newer version is probably already available
    7 for download. Check one of the mirror sites below for updated
     5<para>This is <acronym>BLFS</acronym>-BOOK version &version; dated &releasedate;.
     6If this version is older than a month a newer version is probably already
     7available for download. Check one of the mirror sites below for updated
    88versions.</para>
    9 
    10 <para>Below is a list of our current HTTP and FTP mirror sites as
    11 of September 29th 2002. This list might not be accurate anymore.
    12 The latest info can be found on our website at
    13 <ulink url="http://beyond.linuxfromscratch.org"/>.</para>
    14 
    15 <sect2>
    16 <title>HTTP Mirrors</title>
    17 
    18 <sect3>
    19 <title>North America</title>
    20 
    21 <itemizedlist>
    22 
    23 <listitem><para>Ottawa, Ontario, Canada [100 Mbps] - <ulink
    24 url="http://beyond.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/intro.shtml"/></para></listitem>
    25 
    26 <listitem><para>Calgary, Alberta, Canada [10 Mbps] - <ulink
    27 url="http://beyond.ca.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/intro.shtml"/></para></listitem>
    28 
    29 <listitem><para>Columbus, Ohio, USA [1 Mbit] - <ulink
    30 url="http://beyond.us.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/intro.shtml"/></para></listitem>
    31 
    32 </itemizedlist>
    33 
    34 </sect3>
    35 
    36 <sect3>
    37 <title>Europe</title>
    38 
    39 <itemizedlist>
    40 
    41 <listitem><para>Amsterdam, The Netherlands [100 Mbps] - <ulink
    42 url="http://beyond.nl.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/intro.shtml"/></para></listitem>
    43 
    44 <listitem><para>Oslo, Norway [100 Mbit] - <ulink
    45 url="http://beyond.no.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/intro.shtml"/></para></listitem>
    46 
    47 <listitem><para>Karlsruhe/Germany [100 Mbit] - <ulink
    48 url="http://blfs.netservice-neuss.de/blfs/intro.shtml"/></para></listitem>
    49 
    50 <listitem><para>Vienna Univ. of Technology, Austria [64 Mbit] - <ulink
    51 url="http://beyond.at.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/intro.shtml"/></para></listitem>
    52 
    53 <listitem><para>Karlskrona, Sweden [10 Mbit] - <ulink
    54 url="http://beyond.se.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/intro.shtml"/></para></listitem>
    55 
    56 <listitem><para>Teeside, United Kingdom [256 Kbit] - <ulink
    57 url="http://beyond.linuxfromscratch.co.uk/blfs/intro.shtml"/></para></listitem>
    58 
    59 </itemizedlist>
    60 
    61 </sect3>
    62 
    63 <sect3>
    64 <title>Australia</title>
    65 
    66 <itemizedlist>
    67 
    68 <listitem><para>Brisbane, Australia [155 Mbit] - <ulink
    69 url="http://beyond.au.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/intro.shtml"/></para></listitem>
    70 
    71 </itemizedlist>
    72 
    73 </sect3>
    74 
    75 </sect2>
    769
    7710</sect1>
    7811
     12<sect1 id="intro-welcome-mirrors" xreflabel="Mirrors">
     13<title>Mirror sites</title>
     14
     15<para>The <acronym>BLFS</acronym> project has a number of mirrors setup
     16world-wide to make it easier and more convenient for you to access the
     17website.  Please visit the <ulink url="http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs">
     18http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs</ulink> website for the list of current
     19mirrors.</para>
     20
     21</sect1>
     22
     23
  • introduction/welcome/welcome.xml

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    22<?dbhtml filename="welcome.html" dir="introduction"?>
    33<title>Welcome to BLFS</title>
    4 <para>The Beyond LinuxFromScratch book is designed to carry on from
    5 where the LFS book leaves off.  Unlike the LFS book, it isn't designed
    6 to be followed straight through.  Reading the <xref
    7 linkend="intro-welcome-whichsections"/> part of this chapter should
     4<para>The Beyond Linux From Scratch book is designed to carry on from
     5where the <acronym>LFS</acronym> book leaves off.  Unlike the <acronym>LFS
     6</acronym> book, it isn't designed to be followed straight through.  Reading
     7the <xref linkend="intro-welcome-whichsections"/> part of this chapter should
    88help guide you through the book.</para>
    99
     
    1111quite a few of the conventions we use throughout the book.</para>
    1212
     13&intro-welcome-acks;
     14&intro-welcome-credits;
     15&intro-welcome-whichsect;
    1316&intro-welcome-conventions;
    1417&intro-welcome-version;
    15 &intro-welcome-acks;
    16 &intro-welcome-credits;
    1718&intro-welcome-changelog;
    18 &intro-welcome-whichsect;
    1919&intro-welcome-mailinglists;
    2020&intro-welcome-newsserver;
     21&intro-welcome-askhelp;
    2122&intro-welcome-contact;
    22 &intro-welcome-askhelp;
    2323</chapter>
  • introduction/welcome/which.xml

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    33<title>Which sections of the book do I want?</title>
    44
    5 <para>Unlike the LinuxFromScratch book, BLFS isn't designed to be
    6 followed in a linear manner.  This is because LFS provides instructions
    7 on how to create a base system which is capable of turning into anything
    8 from a web server to a multimedia desktop system.  BLFS is where we try
    9 to guide you through going from the base system to your intended
    10 destination and so choice is very much involved.</para>
     5<para>Unlike the Linux From Scratch book, <acronym>BLFS</acronym> isn't
     6designed to be followed in a linear manner.  This is because <acronym>LFS
     7</acronym> provides instructions on how to create a base system which is
     8capable of turning into anything from a web server to a multimedia desktop
     9system.  <acronym>BLFS</acronym> is where we try to guide you through going
     10from the base system to your intended destination and so choice is very much
     11involved.</para>
    1112
    1213<para>Everyone who reads the book will want to read certain sections.  The
     
    2324linkend="postlfs-editors"/>) and Shells (<xref linkend="postlfs-shells"/>).
    2425Indeed, you may wish to reference certain parts of this chapter (especially
    25 the sections on Editors and Filesystems) while building your LFS system.</para>
     26the sections on Editors and Filesystems) while building your <acronym>LFS
     27</acronym> system.</para>
    2628
    2729<para>Following these basic items, most people will want to at least browse
    2830through the <xref linkend="general"/> part of the book.  This part contains
    2931information on many items which are prerequisites for other sections of the
    30 book as well as some items (such as Programming (<xref
    31 linkend="general-prog"/>) which are useful in their own right.  Note
    32 that you don't have to install all of these libraries and packages found in
    33 this part to start with, each BLFS install procedure tells you which packages
     32book as well as some items (such as Programming (<xref linkend="general-prog"/>)
     33which are useful in their own right.  Note that you don't have to install all
     34of these libraries and packages found in this part to start with, each
     35<acronym>BLFS</acronym> install procedure tells you which packages
    3436it depends upon so you can choose the program you want to install and see
    3537what it needs.</para>
     
    3739<para>Likewise, most people will probably want to look at the <xref
    3840linkend="connect"/> and <xref linkend="basicnet"/> parts.  The first of
    39 these deals with connecting to the Internet or your local LAN using a variety
    40 of methods such as DHCP (<xref linkend="connect-dhcp"/>) and Dial-Up
    41 Connections (<xref linkend="connect-dialup"/>).  The second of these parts
    42 deals with items such as Networking Libraries (<xref
    43 linkend="basicnet-netlibs"/>) and various basic networking programs and
    44 utilities.</para>
     41these deals with connecting to the Internet or your <acronym>LAN
     42</acronym> using a variety of methods such as <acronym>DHCP</acronym>
     43(<xref linkend="connect-dhcp"/>) and Dial-Up Connections (<xref
     44linkend="connect-dialup"/>).  The second of these parts deals with items
     45such as Networking Libraries (<xref linkend="basicnet-netlibs"/>) and various
     46basic networking programs and utilities.</para>
    4547
    4648<para>Once you have dealt with these basics, you may wish to configure
     
    5961<para>We then move on to deal with <xref linkend="multimedia"/> packages.
    6062Note that many people may want to use the <xref linkend="alsa"/>
    61 instructions from this chapter quite near the start of their BLFS journey;
    62 they are placed here simply because it is the most logical place for
    63 them.</para>
     63instructions from this chapter quite near the start of their <acronym>BLFS
     64</acronym> journey; they are placed here simply because it is the most logical
     65place for them.</para>
    6466
    65 <para>The final part of the main BLFS book deals with <xref
     67<para>The final part of the main <acronym>BLFS</acronym> book deals with <xref
    6668linkend="pst"/>.  This is useful for most people with desktop systems and
    6769even those who are creating mainly server systems will find it useful.</para>
     
    7072useful information which you may need to use as a reference.</para>
    7173
    72 <para>We hope you enjoy using BLFS and find it useful.</para>
     74<para>We hope you enjoy using <acronym>BLFS</acronym> and find it useful.</para>
    7375
    7476</sect1>
  • preface/foreword.xml

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    3232<para>Enjoy using <acronym>BLFS</acronym>.</para>
    3333
    34 <para>Mark Hymers &lt;markh@linuxfromscratch.org&gt;
    35 BLFS Editor (July 2001 - March 2003)</para>
     34<blockquote><literallayout>Mark Hymers
     35markh@linuxfromscratch.org
     36BLFS Editor (July 2001 - March 2003)</literallayout></blockquote>
    3637
    3738
     
    5152your <acronym>BLFS</acronym> experience.</para>
    5253
    53 <para>Larry Lawrence &lt;larry@linuxfromscratch.org&gt; BLFS Editor
    54 (March 2003 - present)</para>
     54<blockquote><literallayout>Larry Lawrence
     55larry@linuxfromscratch.org
     56BLFS Editor (March 2003 - present)</literallayout></blockquote>
    5557
    5658</sect1>
  • preface/organization.xml

    r1aacd4b5 racfc391  
    99the rest of the book.</para></sect2>
    1010
    11 <sect2><title>Part II - Post LFS Configuration and Extra Software</title>
     11<sect2><title>Part II - Post <acronym>LFS</acronym> Configuration and Extra
     12Software</title>
    1213<para>Here we introduce basic configuration and security issues.  We also
    1314discuss a range of editors, filesystems and shells which aren't covered in
     
    1718<para>In this section we cover libraries which are often needed by the rest
    1819of the book as well as system utilities.  Information on Programming
    19 (including recompiling <application>gcc</application> to support its full range of languages) concludes
    20 this part.</para></sect2>
     20(including recompiling <application>gcc</application> to support its full range
     21of languages) concludes this part.</para></sect2>
    2122
    2223<sect2><title>Part IV - Connecting to a Network</title>
     
    3132<sect2><title>Part VI - Server Networking</title>
    3233<para>Here we deal with setting up mail and other servers (such as
    33 <application>SSH</application>,
    34 <application>CVS</application>, etc.).</para></sect2>
     34<application>SSH</application>, <application>CVS</application>, etc.).</para></sect2>
    3535
    3636<sect2><title>Part VII - Content Serving</title>
     
    4848
    4949<sect2><title>Part X - GNOME</title>
    50 <para><application>GNOME</application> is the main alternative to <application>KDE</application> in the Desktop Environment arena
    51 and we cover both gnome-1.4 and gnome-&gnome-version; here.</para></sect2>
     50<para><application>GNOME</application> is the main alternative to <application>
     51KDE</application> in the Desktop Environment arena and we cover both gnome-1.4
     52and gnome-&gnome-version; here.</para></sect2>
    5253
    5354<sect2><title>Part XI - X Software</title>
    54 <para>Office programs and graphical web browsers are important to most
    55 people.  They, along with some generic <application>X</application> software can be found in this part
    56 of the book.</para></sect2>
     55<para>Office programs and graphical web browsers are important to most people. 
     56They, along with some generic <application>X</application> software can be
     57found in this part of the book.</para></sect2>
    5758
    5859<sect2><title>Part XII - Multimedia</title>
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