Changeset b92d4b3


Ignore:
Timestamp:
05/07/2005 12:23:20 PM (17 years ago)
Author:
Manuel Canales Esparcia <manuel@…>
Branches:
10.0, 10.1, 11.0, 6.1, 6.2, 6.2.0, 6.2.0-rc1, 6.2.0-rc2, 6.3, 6.3-rc1, 6.3-rc2, 6.3-rc3, 7.10, 7.4, 7.5, 7.6, 7.6-blfs, 7.6-systemd, 7.7, 7.8, 7.9, 8.0, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 9.0, 9.1, basic, bdubbs/svn, elogind, gnome, kde5-13430, kde5-14269, kde5-14686, ken/refactor-virt, krejzi/svn, lazarus, nosym, perl-modules, qt5new, systemd-11177, systemd-13485, trunk, xry111/git-date, xry111/git-date-for-trunk, xry111/git-date-test
Children:
f88c4ee
Parents:
d5f2a3f
Message:

Tagged unpacking.xml

git-svn-id: svn://svn.linuxfromscratch.org/BLFS/trunk/BOOK@4016 af4574ff-66df-0310-9fd7-8a98e5e911e0

File:
1 edited

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  • introduction/important/unpacking.xml

    rd5f2a3f rb92d4b3  
    77
    88<sect1 id="intro-important-unpacking">
    9 <sect1info>
    10   <othername>$LastChangedBy$</othername>
    11   <date>$Date$</date>
    12 </sect1info>
     9  <?dbhtml filename="unpacking.html"?>
    1310
    14 <?dbhtml filename="unpacking.html"?>
    15 <title>Notes on building software</title>
     11  <sect1info>
     12    <othername>$LastChangedBy$</othername>
     13    <date>$Date$</date>
     14  </sect1info>
    1615
    17 <para>Those people who have built an <acronym>LFS</acronym> system will be aware
    18 of the general principles of downloading and unpacking software.  We will
    19 however repeat some of that information here for those new to building
    20 their own software.</para>
     16  <title>Notes on Building Software</title>
    2117
    22 <para>Each set of installation instructions contains a <acronym>URL</acronym>
    23 from which you can download the package.  We do however keep a selection of
    24 patches available via http.  These are referenced as needed in the
    25 installation instructions.</para>
     18  <para>Those people who have built an LFS system will be aware
     19  of the general principles of downloading and unpacking software.  We will
     20  however repeat some of that information here for those new to building
     21  their own software.</para>
    2622
    27 <para>While you can keep the source files anywhere you like, we
    28 assume that you have unpacked them and unzipped any required patches
    29 into <filename>/usr/src</filename>.</para>
     23  <para>Each set of installation instructions contains a URL from which you
     24  can download the package.  We do however keep a selection of patches
     25  available via http.  These are referenced as needed in the installation
     26  instructions.</para>
    3027
    31 <para>We can not emphasize strongly enough that you should start from a
    32 <emphasis>clean source tree</emphasis> each time.  This means that if
    33 you have had an error, it's usually best to delete the source tree and
    34 re-unpack it <emphasis>before</emphasis> trying again.  This obviously
    35 doesn't apply if you're an advanced user used to hacking Makefiles and C
    36 code, but if in doubt, start from a clean tree.</para>
     28  <para>While you can keep the source files anywhere you like, we
     29  assume that you have unpacked them and unzipped any required patches
     30  into <filename>/usr/src</filename>.</para>
    3731
    38 <sect2>
    39 <title>Unpacking the software</title>
     32  <para>We can not emphasize strongly enough that you should start from a
     33  <emphasis>clean source tree</emphasis> each time. This means that if
     34  you have had an error, it's usually best to delete the source tree and
     35  re-unpack it <emphasis>before</emphasis> trying again. This obviously
     36  doesn't apply if you're an advanced user used to hacking Makefiles and C
     37  code, but if in doubt, start from a clean tree.</para>
    4038
    41 <para>If a file is tar'ed and compressed, it is unpacked by running one of
    42 the following commands:</para>
     39  <sect2>
     40    <title>Unpacking the Software</title>
    4341
    44 <screen><command>tar -xf filename.tar.gz
    45 tar -xf filename.tgz
    46 tar -xf filename.tar.Z
    47 tar -xf filename.tar.bz2</command></screen>
     42    <para>If a file is tar'ed and compressed, it is unpacked by running one of
     43    the following commands:</para>
    4844
    49 <para>You can also use a slightly different method:</para>
     45<screen><command>tar -xvf filename.tar.gz
     46tar -xvf filename.tgz
     47tar -xvf filename.tar.Z
     48tar -xvf filename.tar.bz2</command></screen>
     49
     50    <para>You can also use a slightly different method:</para>
    5051
    5152<screen><command>bzcat filename.tar.bz2 | tar -xv</command></screen>
    5253
    53 <para>Finally, you sometimes need to be able to unpack patches which are
    54 generally not tar'ed.  The best way to do this is to copy the patch file to
    55 <filename>/usr/src</filename> and then to run one of the following commands
    56 depending on whether the file is .gz or .bz2:</para>
     54    <para>Finally, you sometimes need to be able to unpack patches which are
     55    generally not tar'ed.  The best way to do this is to copy the patch file to
     56    <filename>/usr/src</filename> and then to run one of the following commands
     57    depending on whether the file is <filename>.gz</filename> or
     58    <filename>.bz2</filename>:</para>
    5759
    58 <screen><command>gunzip patchname.gz
    59 bunzip2 patchname.bz2</command></screen>
     60<screen><command>gunzip -v patchname.gz
     61bunzip2 -v patchname.bz2</command></screen>
    6062
    61 </sect2>
     63  </sect2>
    6264
    63 <sect2>
    64 <title>Verifying file integrity using md5sum</title>
     65  <sect2>
     66    <title>Verifying File Integrity Using 'md5sum'</title>
    6567
    66 <para>Generally, to verify that the downloaded file is genuine and complete,
    67 most package maintainers also distribute md5sums of the files.
    68 To verify the md5sum of the downloaded files, download both the file and the
    69 corresponding md5sum file to the same directory (preferably from different
    70 on-line locations), and (assuming file.md5sum is the md5sum file downloaded)
    71 run the following command:</para>
     68    <para>Generally, to verify that the downloaded file is genuine and complete,
     69    most package maintainers also distribute md5sums of the files.
     70    To verify the md5sum of the downloaded files, download both the file and the
     71    corresponding md5sum file to the same directory (preferably from different
     72    on-line locations), and (assuming file.md5sum is the md5sum file downloaded)
     73    run the following command:</para>
    7274
    7375<screen><command>md5sum -c file.md5sum</command></screen>
    7476
    75 <para>If there are any errors, they will be reported.</para>
     77    <para>If there are any errors, they will be reported.</para>
    7678
    77 </sect2>
     79  </sect2>
    7880
    79 <sect2>
    80 <title>Creating Log files during installation</title>
     81  <sect2>
     82    <title>Creating Log Files During Installation</title>
    8183
    82 <para>For larger packages, it is convenient to create log files instead of
    83 staring at the screen hoping to catch a particular error or warning. Log files
    84 are also useful for debugging and keeping records. The following command
    85 allows you to create an installation log. Replace &lt;command&gt; with the
    86 command you intend to execute.</para>
     84    <para>For larger packages, it is convenient to create log files instead of
     85    staring at the screen hoping to catch a particular error or warning. Log files
     86    are also useful for debugging and keeping records. The following command
     87    allows you to create an installation log. Replace &lt;command&gt; with the
     88    command you intend to execute.</para>
    8789
    8890<screen><command>( &lt;command&gt; 2&gt;&amp;1 | tee compile.log &amp;&amp; exit $PIPESTATUS )</command></screen>
    8991
    90 <para><parameter>2&gt;&amp;1</parameter> redirects error messages
    91 to the same location as standard output. The <command>tee</command> command
    92 allows viewing of the output while logging the results to a file. The parentheses
    93 around the command run the entire command in a subshell and finally the
    94 <command>exit $PIPESTATUS</command> ensures the result of the &lt;command&gt;
    95 is returned as the result and not the result of the <command>tee</command> command.</para>
     92    <para><option>2&gt;&amp;1</option> redirects error messages to the same
     93    location as standard output. The <command>tee</command> command allows
     94    viewing of the output while logging the results to a file. The parentheses
     95    around the command run the entire command in a subshell and finally the
     96    <command>exit $PIPESTATUS</command> ensures the result of the
     97    &lt;command&gt; is returned as the result and not the result of the
     98    <command>tee</command> command.</para>
    9699
    97 </sect2>
     100  </sect2>
    98101
    99102</sect1>
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