Ignore:
Timestamp:
03/23/2021 07:24:51 PM (6 months ago)
Author:
Bruce Dubbs <bdubbs@…>
Branches:
11.0, ken/refactor-virt, lazarus, qt5new, trunk, xry111/git-date, xry111/git-date-for-trunk, xry111/git-date-test
Children:
5910991c
Parents:
a2c3f1d3
Message:

Editorial changes to new evi pages.

git-svn-id: svn://svn.linuxfromscratch.org/BLFS/trunk/BOOK@24395 af4574ff-66df-0310-9fd7-8a98e5e911e0

File:
1 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • postlfs/filesystems/uefi-bootloaders/grub-setup.xml

    ra2c3f1d3 rd5cc78a  
    2020
    2121    <para>
    22       BLFS doesn't have the essential packages to support Secure Boot. To
     22      BLFS does not have the essential packages to support Secure Boot. To
    2323      set up the boot process with GRUB for UEFI installed in BLFS, Secure
    2424      Boot must be turned off from the configuration interface of the
     
    3333    <para>
    3434      Ensure that an emergency boot disk is ready to <quote>rescue</quote>
    35       the system, in case the system becomes un-bootable.  To make a
    36       emergency boot disk with GRUB for EFI platform, at first find a spare
     35      the system in case the system becomes un-bootable.  To make an
     36      emergency boot disk with GRUB for an EFI based system, find a spare
    3737      USB flash drive and create a
    3838      <systemitem class="filesystem">vfat</systemitem> file system on it.
     
    5555    <para>
    5656      Still as the <systemitem class="username">root</systemitem> user, use
    57       the CLI of <command>fdisk</command> utility to set the first parition
     57      the <command>fdisk</command> utility to set the first parition
    5858      of the USB flash drive to be an <quote>EFI system</quote> partition
    5959      (change <userinput>sdx</userinput> to the device node corresponding
     
    101101    <para>
    102102      Now the USB flash drive can be used as a emergency boot disk on x86-64
    103       UEFI platform.  It will boot the system and show GRUB shell.  Then you
    104       can type commands to boot your operation systems on the hard drive.
    105       To get how to select the boot device, read the manual of your
     103      UEFI platform.  It will boot the system and show the GRUB shell.  Then you
     104      can type commands to boot your operating systems on the hard drive.
     105      To learn how to select the boot device, read the manual of your
    106106      motherboard or laptop.
    107107    </para>
     
    145145        <term><parameter>CONFIG_EFI_STUB</parameter></term>
    146146        <listitem>
    147           <para>Though EFI stub is designed to boot a kernel directly from
    148           the UEFI firmware (without bootloaders like GRUB), GRUB needs the
    149           kernel being loaded to support EFI handover protocol enabled by
     147          <para>Although the EFI stub is designed to boot a kernel directly from
     148          the UEFI firmware (without a bootloader like GRUB), GRUB needs the
     149          kernel to be loaded to support the EFI handover protocol enabled by
    150150          this option.</para>
    151151        </listitem>
     
    155155        <term><parameter>CONFIG_EFI_VARS</parameter></term>
    156156        <listitem>
    157           <para>Don't use this option deprecated because of an 1024-byte
     157          <para>Don't use this deprecated option because of a 1024-byte
    158158          variable size limit.  Its function is replaced by
    159159          <parameter>CONFIG_EFIVAR_FS</parameter>.</para>
     
    165165        <listitem>
    166166          <para>The combination of these two options allows the kernel to
    167           print debug messages (along with Tux logos) on early stage of boot
    168           process with UEFI.</para>
     167          print debug messages (along with Tux logos) at the early stage of boot
     168          the process with UEFI.</para>
    169169        </listitem>
    170170      </varlistentry>
     
    179179    <para>
    180180      On EFI based system, the bootloaders are installed in a special FAT32
    181       partition called <emphasis>EFI System Partition</emphasis> (ESP).
     181      partition called an <emphasis>EFI System Partition</emphasis> (ESP).
    182182      If your system supports EFI, and a recent version of Linux
    183183      distribution or Windows is pre-installed, it's likely that the ESP
     
    185185      <systemitem class="username">root</systemitem> user, list all the
    186186      partitions on your hard drive (replace <userinput>sda</userinput>
    187       with the device node corresponding to the hard drive):
     187      with the device corresponding to the appropriate hard drive):
    188188    </para>
    189189
     
    196196
    197197    <para>
    198       If the system or the hard drive is new, or it's the first time to
    199       install an UEFI booted OS on the system, the ESP may be nonexistent.
    200       Then create a new partition, make a
     198      If the system or the hard drive is new, or it's a first time
     199      install an UEFI booted OS on the system, the ESP may not exist.
     200      In that case, create a new partition, make a
    201201      <systemitem class="filesystem">vfat</systemitem> file system on it,
    202       and set the partition type to <quote>EFI system</quote>.  Read the
     202      and set the partition type to <quote>EFI system</quote>.  See the
    203203      instructions for the emergency boot device above as a reference.
    204204    </para>
     
    222222
    223223    <para>
    224       It's recommended to add an entry for the ESP in
     224      Add an entry for the ESP in
    225225      <filename>/etc/fstab</filename>, so it will be mounted automatically
    226226      during system boot:
     
    237237
    238238    <para>
    239       The installation of GRUB on UEFI platform requires the EFI Variable
    240       file system (<systemitem class="filesystem">efivarfs</systemitem>)
     239      The installation of GRUB on a UEFI platform requires that the EFI Variable
     240      file system, <systemitem class="filesystem">efivarfs</systemitem>, to be
    241241      mounted.  As the <systemitem class="username">root</systemitem> user:
    242242    </para>
     
    248248        If the system is booted with UEFI and systemd,
    249249        <systemitem class="filesystem">efivarfs</systemitem> will be mounted
    250         automatically.  However in LFS chroot environment it still needs to
     250        automatically.  However in the LFS chroot environment it still needs to
    251251        be mounted manually.
    252252      </para>
     
    254254
    255255    <para revision="sysv">
    256       It's recommended to add an entry for the
     256      Now add an entry for the
    257257      <systemitem class="filesystem">efivarfs</systemitem> in
    258       <filename>/etc/fstab</filename>, so it will be mounted automatically
     258      <filename>/etc/fstab</filename> so it will be mounted automatically
    259259      during system boot:
    260260    </para>
     
    279279    <para>
    280280      On UEFI based systems, GRUB works by installing an EFI application
    281       (a special kind of PE executable) into
     281      (a special kind of executable) into
    282282      <filename class="directory">/boot/efi/EFI/[id]/grubx64.efi</filename>,
    283283      where <filename class="directory">/boot/efi</filename> is the mount
    284284      point of the ESP, and <literal>[id]</literal> is replaced with an
    285285      identifier specified in the <command>grub-install</command> command
    286       line.  Then GRUB will create an entry in the EFI variables containing
    287       the path <literal>EFI/[id]/grubx64.efi</literal>, so the EFI firmware
     286      line.  GRUB will create an entry in the EFI variables containing
     287      the path <literal>EFI/[id]/grubx64.efi</literal> so the EFI firmware
    288288      can find <filename>grubx64.efi</filename> and load it.
    289289    </para>
     
    291291    <para>
    292292      <filename>grubx64.efi</filename> is very lightweight (136 KB with
    293       GRUB-2.06~rc1) so it won't cost much space in the ESP.  A typical ESP
    294       size is 100 MB (for Windows boot manager, which cost about 50 MB in
     293      GRUB-2.06~rc1) so it will not use much space in the ESP.  A typical ESP
     294      size is 100 MB (for Windows boot manager, which uses about 50 MB in
    295295      the ESP). Once <filename>grubx64.efi</filename> loaded by the
    296296      firmware, it will load GRUB modules in the boot partition.
     
    302302      As the <systemitem class="username">root</systemitem> user, install
    303303      the GRUB files into <filename>/boot/efi/EFI/LFS/grubx64.efi</filename>
    304       and <filename class="directory">/boot/grub</filename>, and set up the
     304      and <filename class="directory">/boot/grub</filename>. Then set up the
    305305      boot entry in the EFI variables:
    306306    </para>
     
    331331
    332332    <para>
    333       Note that <literal>0005</literal> is the first in
     333      Note that <literal>0005</literal> is the first in the
    334334      <literal>BootOrder</literal>, and <literal>Boot0005</literal>
    335       is <literal>LFS</literal>.  So on the next boot, GRUB installed
    336       by LFS will be used to boot the system.
     335      is <literal>LFS</literal>. This means that on the next boot, the
     336      version of GRUB installed by LFS will be used to boot the system.
    337337    </para>
    338338
     
    384384      <para>
    385385        From GRUB's perspective, the files are relative to the partition
    386         used. If you used a separate /boot partition, remove /boot from the
     386        are used. If you used a separate /boot partition, remove /boot from the
    387387        above paths (to kernel and to <filename>unicode.pf2</filename>). You
    388388        will also need to change the set root line to point to the boot
     
    418418    <para>
    419419      <literal>(hd0,1)</literal> should be replaced with the GRUB
    420       designated name for the ESP.  <literal>chainloader</literal>
     420      designated name for the ESP.  The <literal>chainloader</literal>
    421421      directive can be used to tell GRUB to run another EFI executable,
    422422      in this case the Windows Boot Manager. You may put more usable tools
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