Changeset 0ea3431


Ignore:
Timestamp:
09/26/2022 02:03:23 PM (4 months ago)
Author:
Xi Ruoyao <xry111@…>
Branches:
xry111/clfs-ng
Children:
259794e
Parents:
1f6dfd4 (diff), f427ba23 (diff)
Note: this is a merge changeset, the changes displayed below correspond to the merge itself.
Use the (diff) links above to see all the changes relative to each parent.
Message:

Merge remote-tracking branch 'origin/trunk' into xry111/clfs-ng

Files:
26 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • bootscripts/ChangeLog

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
     12022-09-30 Bruce Dubbs <bdubbs@linuxfromscratch.org>
     2   * Mount /dev/shm as a tmpfs.
     3
    142022-07-23 Thomas Trepl <thomas@linuxfromscratch.org>
    25   * Mark an raid array clean when root (/) has been remounted
  • bootscripts/lfs/init.d/mountvirtfs

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    3939      fi
    4040
    41       mkdir -p /run/lock /run/shm
    42       chmod 1777 /run/shm /run/lock
     41      mkdir -p   /run/lock
     42      chmod 1777 /run/lock
    4343
    4444      log_info_msg "Mounting virtual file systems: ${INFO}/run"
     
    5959      fi
    6060
    61       ln -sfn /run/shm /dev/shm
     61      mkdir -p /dev/shm
     62      log_info_msg2 " ${INFO}/dev/shm"
     63      mount -o nosuid,nodev /dev/shm || failed=1
    6264
    6365      (exit ${failed})
  • bootscripts/lfs/init.d/swap

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    2121# Default-Start:       S
    2222# Default-Stop:        0 6
    23 # Short-Description:   Mounts and unmounts swap partitions.
    24 # Description:         Mounts and unmounts swap partitions defined in
     23# Short-Description:   Activates and deactivates swap partitions.
     24# Description:         Activates and deactivates swap partitions defined in
    2525#                      /etc/fstab.
    2626# X-LFS-Provided-By:   LFS
  • chapter01/changelog.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    4040    appropriate for the entry or if needed the entire day's listitem.
    4141    -->
     42
     43    <listitem>
     44      <para>2022-09-22</para>
     45      <itemizedlist>
     46        <listitem>
     47          <para>[bdubbs] - Update to expat-2.4.9 (Security Update). Fixes
     48          <ulink url="&lfs-ticket-root;5117">#5117</ulink>.</para>
     49        </listitem>
     50      </itemizedlist>
     51    </listitem>
     52
     53    <listitem>
     54      <para>2022-09-20</para>
     55      <itemizedlist>
     56        <listitem>
     57          <para>[bdubbs] - Adapt instructions depending on
     58          host setup of /dev/shm when creating virtual filesystems
     59          for chroot.</para>
     60        </listitem>
     61      </itemizedlist>
     62    </listitem>
    4263
    4364    <listitem>
  • chapter01/how.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    4747  work your way through <xref linkend="chapter-cross-tools"/> and beyond.</para>
    4848
    49   <para><xref linkend="chapter-cross-tools"/>,  explains the installation of
     49  <para><xref linkend="chapter-cross-tools"/>  explains the installation of
    5050  the initial tool chain, (binutils, gcc, and glibc) using cross compilation
    5151  techniques to isolate the new tools from the host system.</para>
     
    6565  provided in <xref linkend="ch-tools-toolchaintechnotes"/>.</para>
    6666
    67   <para>In <xref linkend="chapter-building-system"/>, The
     67  <para>In <xref linkend="chapter-building-system"/> the
    6868  full LFS system is built.</para>
    6969
  • chapter01/whatsnew.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    7575       <para>Eudev-&eudev-version;</para>
    7676    </listitem>-->
    77     <!--<listitem>
     77    <listitem>
    7878       <para>Expat-&expat-version;</para>
    79     </listitem>-->
     79    </listitem>
    8080    <!--<listitem>
    8181       <para>Expect-&expect-version;</para>
  • chapter02/aboutlfs.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    1616  directory where you will be building your LFS system - we will use
    1717  <filename class="directory">/mnt/lfs</filename> as an example, but the
    18   directory choice is up to you. Choose a directory location and set the
     18  choose any directory name you want. Choose a directory location and set the
    1919  variable with the following command:</para>
    2020
     
    2424  <command>mkdir -v $LFS/tools</command> can be typed literally. The shell
    2525  will automatically replace <quote>$LFS</quote> with
    26   <quote>/mnt/lfs</quote> (or whatever the variable was set to) when it
     26  <quote>/mnt/lfs</quote> (or whatever value the variable was set to) when it
    2727  processes the command line.</para>
    2828
     
    5555  enter the export command above.  In addition, the shell specified in the
    5656  <filename>/etc/passwd</filename> file for all users that need the
    57   <envar>LFS</envar> variable needs to be bash to ensure that the
     57  <envar>LFS</envar> variable must be bash to ensure that the
    5858  <filename>/root/.bash_profile</filename> file is incorporated as a part of
    5959  the login process.</para>
     
    6565  the <filename>.bashrc</filename> file for the user and
    6666  <systemitem class="username">root</systemitem>.  In addition,
    67   some distributions have instructions to not run the <filename>.bashrc</filename>
    68   instructions in a non-interactive bash invocation.  Be sure to add the
    69   export command before the test for non-interactive use.</para>
     67  some distributions use an "if" test, and do not run the remaining <filename>.bashrc</filename>
     68  instructions for a non-interactive bash invocation.  Be sure to place the
     69  export command ahead of the test for non-interactive use.</para>
    7070
    7171  </note>
  • chapter02/creatingfilesystem.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    1111  <title>Creating a File System on the Partition</title>
    1212
    13   <para>Now that a blank partition has been set up, the file system can be
    14   created.  LFS can use any file system recognized by the Linux kernel, but the
    15   most common types are ext3 and ext4.  The choice of file system can be
    16   complex and depends on the characteristics of the files and the size of
     13  <para>A partition is just a range of sectors on a disk drive, delimited by
     14  boundaries set in a partition table. Before the operating system can use
     15  a partition to store any files, the partition must be formatted to contain a file
     16  system, typically consisting of a label, directory blocks, data blocks, and
     17  an indexing scheme to locate a particular file on demand. The file system
     18  also helps the OS keep track of free space on the partition, reserve the
     19  needed sectors when a new file is created or an existing file is extended,
     20  and recycle the free data segments created when files are deleted. It may
     21  also provide support for data redundancy, and for error recovery.</para>
     22 
     23  <para>LFS can use any file system recognized by the Linux kernel, but the
     24  most common types are ext3 and ext4.  The choice of the right file system can be
     25  complex; it depends on the characteristics of the files and the size of
    1726  the partition.  For example:</para>
    1827
     
    3443    <varlistentry>
    3544      <term>ext4</term>
    36       <listitem><para>is the latest version of the ext file system family of
    37       partition types.  It provides several new capabilities including
    38       nano-second timestamps, creation and use of very large files (16 TB), and
    39       speed improvements.</para>
     45      <listitem><para>is the latest version of the ext family of
     46      file systems.  It provides several new capabilities including
     47      nano-second timestamps, creation and use of very large files
     48      (up to 16 TB), and speed improvements.</para>
    4049      </listitem>
    4150    </varlistentry>
     
    4352
    4453  <para>Other file systems, including FAT32, NTFS, ReiserFS, JFS, and XFS are
    45   useful for specialized purposes.  More information about these file systems
    46   can be found at <ulink
     54  useful for specialized purposes. More information about these file systems,
     55  and many others, can be found at <ulink
    4756  url="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_file_systems"/>.</para>
    4857
    49   <para>LFS assumes that the root file system (/) is of type ext4.  To create
     58  <para>LFS assumes that the root file system (/) is of type ext4. To create
    5059  an <systemitem class="filesystem">ext4</systemitem> file system on the LFS
    51   partition, run the following:</para>
     60  partition, issue the following command:</para>
    5261
    5362<screen role="nodump"><userinput>mkfs -v -t ext4 /dev/<replaceable>&lt;xxx&gt;</replaceable></userinput></screen>
  • chapter02/creatingpartition.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    9595    <para>Swapping is never good. For mechanical hard drives you can generally
    9696    tell if a system is swapping by just listening to disk activity and
    97     observing how the system reacts to commands.  For an SSD drive you will not
    98     be able to hear swapping but you can tell how much swap space is being used
    99     by the <command>top</command> or <command>free</command> programs.  Use of
    100     an SSD drive for a swap partition should be avoided if possible.  The first
     97    observing how the system reacts to commands. With an SSD you will not
     98    be able to hear swapping, but you can tell how much swap space is being used
     99    by running the <command>top</command> or <command>free</command> programs.  Use of
     100    an SSD for a swap partition should be avoided if possible.  The first
    101101    reaction to swapping should be to check for an unreasonable command such as
    102102    trying to edit a five gigabyte file. If swapping becomes a normal
     
    113113    loader. This partition will normally be labeled 'BIOS Boot' if using
    114114    <command>fdisk</command> or have a code of <emphasis>EF02</emphasis> if
    115     using <command>gdisk</command>.</para>
     115    using the <command>gdisk</command> command.</para>
    116116
    117117    <note><para>The Grub Bios partition must be on the drive that the BIOS
    118     uses to boot the system.  This is not necessarily the same drive where the
    119     LFS root partition is located. Disks on a system may use different
    120     partition table types.  The requirement for this partition depends
     118    uses to boot the system.  This is not necessarily the drive that holds
     119    the LFS root partition. The disks on a system may use different
     120    partition table types. The necessity of the Grub Bios partition depends
    121121    only on the partition table type of the boot disk.</para></note>
    122122    </sect3>
     
    134134      store kernels and other booting information.  To minimize potential boot
    135135      problems with larger disks, make this the first physical partition on
    136       your first disk drive.  A partition size of 200 megabytes is quite
     136      your first disk drive.  A partition size of 200 megabytes is
    137137      adequate.</para></listitem>
    138138
     
    151151      <filename class="directory">/lib</filename>, and
    152152      <filename class="directory">/sbin</filename> are symlinks to their
    153       counterpart in <filename class="directory">/usr</filename>.
    154       So <filename class="directory">/usr</filename> contains all binaries
     153      counterparts in <filename class="directory">/usr</filename>.
     154      So <filename class="directory">/usr</filename> contains all the binaries
    155155      needed for the system to run.  For LFS a separate partition for
    156156      <filename class="directory">/usr</filename> is normally not needed.
    157       If you need it anyway, you should make a partition large enough to
    158       fit all programs and libraries in the system. The root partition can be
     157      If you create it anyway, you should make a partition large enough to
     158      fit all the programs and libraries in the system. The root partition can be
    159159      very small (maybe just one gigabyte) in this configuration, so it's
    160160      suitable for a thin client or diskless workstation (where
    161161      <filename class="directory">/usr</filename> is mounted from a remote
    162       server).  However you should take care that an initramfs (not covered by
    163       LFS) will be needed to boot a system with separate
     162      server). However, you should be aware that an initramfs (not covered by
     163      LFS) will be needed to boot a system with a separate
    164164      <filename class="directory">/usr</filename> partition.</para></listitem>
    165165
    166166      <listitem><para>/opt &ndash; This directory is most useful for
    167       BLFS where multiple installations of large packages like Gnome or KDE can
     167      BLFS, where multiple large packages like KDE or Texlive can
    168168      be installed without embedding the files in the /usr hierarchy.  If
    169169      used, 5 to 10 gigabytes is generally adequate.</para>
    170170      </listitem>
    171171
    172       <listitem><para>/tmp &ndash; A separate /tmp directory is rare, but
    173       useful if configuring a thin client.  This partition, if used, will
    174       usually not need to exceed a couple of gigabytes.</para></listitem>
     172      <listitem revision='sysv'><para>/tmp &ndash; A separate /tmp directory
     173      is rare, but useful if configuring a thin client.  This partition, if
     174      used, will usually not need to exceed a couple of
     175      gigabytes.  If you have enough RAM, you can mount a
     176      <systemitem class='filesystem'>tmpfs</systemitem> on /tmp to make
     177      access to temporary files faster.</para></listitem>
     178
     179      <listitem revision='systemd'><para>/tmp &ndash; By default, systemd
     180      mounts a <systemitem class='filesystem'>tmpfs</systemitem> here.
     181      If you want to override that behavior, follow
     182      <xref linkend='systemd-no-tmpfs'/> when configuring the LFS
     183      system.</para></listitem>
    175184
    176185      <listitem><para>/usr/src &ndash; This partition is very
    177186      useful for providing a location to store BLFS source files and
    178       share them across LFS builds.  It can also be used as a location
    179       for building BLFS packages.  A reasonably large partition of 30-50
    180       gigabytes allows plenty of room.</para></listitem>
     187      share them across LFS builds. It can also be used as a location
     188      for building BLFS packages. A reasonably large partition of 30-50
     189      gigabytes provides plenty of room.</para></listitem>
    181190
    182191    </itemizedlist>
    183192
    184     <para>Any separate partition that you want automatically mounted upon boot
    185     needs to be specified in the <filename>/etc/fstab</filename>.  Details
    186     about how to specify partitions will be discussed in <xref
    187     linkend="ch-bootable-fstab"/>.  </para>
     193    <para>Any separate partition that you want automatically mounted when the
     194    system starts must be specified in the <filename>/etc/fstab</filename> file.
     195    Details about how to specify partitions will be discussed in <xref
     196    linkend="ch-bootable-fstab"/>.</para>
    188197
    189198    </sect3>
  • chapter02/hostreqs.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    4242    <listitem>
    4343      <para><emphasis role="strong">Bison-2.7</emphasis> (/usr/bin/yacc
    44       should be a link to bison or small script that executes bison)</para>
     44      should be a link to bison or a small script that executes bison)</para>
    4545    </listitem>
    4646
  • chapter02/mounting.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    1111  <title>Mounting the New Partition</title>
    1212
    13   <para>Now that a file system has been created, the partition needs to
    14   be made accessible. In order to do this, the partition needs to be
    15   mounted at a chosen mount point. For the purposes of this book, it is
    16   assumed that the file system is mounted under the directory specified by the
    17   <envar>LFS</envar> environment variable as described in the previous section.
     13  <para>Now that a file system has been created, the partition must
     14  be mounted so the host system can access it. This book assumes that
     15  the file system is mounted at the directory specified by the
     16  <envar>LFS</envar> environment variable described in the previous section.
    1817  </para>
    1918
    20   <para>Create the mount point and mount the LFS file system by running:</para>
     19  <para>Create the mount point and mount the LFS file system with these commands:</para>
    2120
    2221<screen role="nodump"><userinput>mkdir -pv $LFS
    2322mount -v -t ext4 /dev/<replaceable>&lt;xxx&gt;</replaceable> $LFS</userinput></screen>
    2423
    25   <para>Replace <replaceable>&lt;xxx&gt;</replaceable> with the designation of the LFS
     24  <para>Replace <replaceable>&lt;xxx&gt;</replaceable> with the name of the LFS
    2625  partition.</para>
    2726
    28   <para>If using multiple partitions for LFS (e.g., one for <filename
    29   class="directory">/</filename> and another for <filename
    30   class="directory">/home</filename>), mount them using:</para>
     27  <para>If you are using multiple partitions for LFS (e.g., one for
     28  <filename class="directory">/</filename> and another for <filename
     29  class="directory">/home</filename>), mount them like this:</para>
    3130
    3231<screen role="nodump"><userinput>mkdir -pv $LFS
     
    4443  without any parameters to see what options are set for the mounted LFS
    4544  partition. If <option>nosuid</option> and/or <option>nodev</option> are set,
    46   the partition will need to be remounted.</para>
     45  the partition must be remounted.</para>
    4746
    48   <warning><para>The above instructions assume that you will not be restarting
     47  <warning><para>The above instructions assume that you will not restart
    4948  your computer throughout the LFS process.  If you shut down your system,
    5049  you will either need to remount the LFS partition each time you restart
    51   the build process or modify your host system's /etc/fstab file to automatically
    52   remount it upon boot.  For example:
     50  the build process, or modify the host system's &fstab; file to automatically
     51  remount it when you reboot. For example, you might add this line to your
     52  &fstab; file:
    5353
    5454<screen role="nodump">/dev/<replaceable>&lt;xxx&gt;</replaceable>  /mnt/lfs ext4   defaults      1     1</screen>
     
    6868  <systemitem class="filesystem">swap</systemitem> partition.</para>
    6969
    70   <para>Now that there is an established place to work, it is time to
     70  <para>Now that the new LFS partition is open for business, it's time to
    7171  download the packages.</para>
    7272
  • chapter02/stages.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    3535
    3636  <sect2>
    37   <title>Chapter&nbsp;5&ndash;6</title>
     37  <title>Chapters&nbsp;5&ndash;6</title>
    3838
    3939    <itemizedlist>
     
    4545        <para>These two chapters <emphasis>must</emphasis> be done as user
    4646        <systemitem class="username">lfs</systemitem>.
    47         A <command>su - lfs</command> needs to be done before any task in these
    48         chapters. Failing to do that, you are at risk of installing packages to the
     47        A <command>su - lfs</command> command must be issued before any task in these
     48        chapters. If you don't do that, you are at risk of installing packages to the
    4949        host, and potentially rendering it unusable.</para>
    5050      </listitem>
     
    5555         doubt about installing a package, ensure any previously expanded
    5656         tarballs are removed, then re-extract the package files, and complete all
    57          instructions in that section.</para>
     57         the instructions in that section.</para>
    5858      </listitem>
    5959    </itemizedlist>
     
    6161
    6262  <sect2>
    63   <title>Chapter&nbsp;7&ndash;10</title>
     63  <title>Chapters&nbsp;7&ndash;10</title>
    6464
    6565    <itemizedlist>
     
    7171        <para>A few operations, from
    7272        <quote>Preparing Virtual Kernel File Systems</quote> to
    73         <quote>Setting up Environment</quote> must be done.</para>
     73        <quote>Setting up Environment</quote>, must be done.</para>
    7474      </listitem>
    7575
  • chapter03/introduction.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    1414  order to build a basic Linux system. The listed version numbers correspond to
    1515  versions of the software that are known to work, and this book is based on
    16   their use. We highly recommend against using different versions because the build
     16  their use. We highly recommend against using different versions, because the build
    1717  commands for one version may not work with a different version, unless the
    18   different version is specified by a LFS errata or security advisory.
     18  different version is specified by an LFS erratum or security advisory.
    1919  The newest package versions may also have problems that require
    2020  work-arounds. These work-arounds will be developed and stabilized in the
     
    2222
    2323  <para>For some packages, the release tarball and the (Git or SVN)
    24   repository snapshot tarball for this release may be published with
    25   similar file name.  A release tarball contains generated files (for
    26   example, <command>configure</command> script generated by
     24  repository snapshot tarball for that release may be published with
     25  similar file names.  A release tarball contains generated files (for
     26  example, a <command>configure</command> script generated by
    2727  <command>autoconf</command>), in addition to the contents of the
    2828  corresponding repository snapshot.  The book uses release tarballs
     
    7070    <listitem>
    7171      <para>For stable versions of the book, a tarball of all the needed files
    72       can be downloaded from one of the LFS files mirrors listed at
     72      can be downloaded from one of the mirror sites listed at
    7373      <ulink url="https://www.linuxfromscratch.org/mirrors.html#files"/>.</para>
    7474    </listitem>
  • chapter03/packages.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    1616    package should be used to avoid security vulnerabilities.</para>
    1717
    18     <para>The upstreams may remove old releases, especially when these
     18    <para>The upstream sources may remove old releases, especially when those
    1919    releases contain a security vulnerability.  If one URL below is not
    2020    reachable, you should read the security advisories first to figure out
     
    2222    not, try to download the removed package from a mirror.  Although it's
    2323    possible to download an old release from a mirror even if this release
    24     has been removed because of a vulnerability, it's not recommended to
    25     use a release known to be vulnerable for building your system.</para>
     24    has been removed because of a vulnerability, it's not a good idea to
     25    use a release known to be vulnerable when building your system.</para>
    2626  </note>
    2727
     
    454454
    455455        <note>
    456           <para>The Linux kernel is updated relatively often, many times due to
     456          <para>The Linux kernel is updated quite frequently, many times due to
    457457          discoveries of security vulnerabilities.  The latest available
    458458          <!--&linux-major-version;.&linux-minor-version;.x--> stable kernel
  • chapter04/creatingminlayout.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    1111  <title>Creating a limited directory layout in LFS filesystem</title>
    1212
    13   <para>The first task performed in the LFS partition is to create a limited
    14   directory hierarchy so that programs compiled in <xref
     13  <para>The next task to be performed in the LFS partition is to create a limited
     14  directory hierarchy, so that the programs compiled in <xref
    1515  linkend="chapter-temporary-tools"/> (as well as glibc and libstdc++ in <xref
    16   linkend="chapter-cross-tools"/>) may be installed in their final
    17   location. This is needed so that those temporary programs be overwritten
    18   when rebuilding them in <xref linkend="chapter-building-system"/>.</para>
     16  linkend="chapter-cross-tools"/>) can be installed in their final
     17  location. We do this so those temporary programs will be overwritten when
     18  the final versions are built in <xref linkend="chapter-building-system"/>.</para>
    1919
    20   <para>Create the required directory layout by running the following as
     20  <para>Create the required directory layout by issuing the following commands as
    2121  <systemitem class="username">root</systemitem>:</para>
    2222
     
    3535
    3636  <para>Programs in <xref linkend="chapter-temporary-tools"/> will be compiled
    37   with a cross-compiler (more details in section <xref
    38   linkend="ch-tools-toolchaintechnotes"/>). In order to separate this
    39   cross-compiler from the other programs, it will be installed in a special
    40   directory. Create this directory with:</para>
     37  with a cross-compiler (more details can be found in section <xref
     38  linkend="ch-tools-toolchaintechnotes"/>). This cross-compiler will be installed
     39  in a special directory, to separate it from the other programs. Still acting as
     40  &root;, create that directory with this command:</para>
    4141
    4242<screen><userinput>mkdir -pv $LFS/tools</userinput></screen>
  • chapter04/introduction.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    1313  <para>In this chapter, we will perform a few additional tasks to prepare
    1414  for building the temporary system. We will create a set of directories in
    15   <filename class="directory">$LFS</filename> for the installation of the
    16   temporary tools, add an unprivileged user to reduce risk,
     15  <filename class="directory">$LFS</filename> (in which we will install the
     16  temporary tools), add an unprivileged user,
    1717  and create an appropriate build environment for that user. We will also
    18   explain the unit of time we use to measure how long LFS packages take to
    19   build, or <quote>SBUs</quote>, and give some information about package
     18  explain the units of time (<quote>SBUs</quote>) we use to measure how
     19  long it takes to build LFS packages, and provide some information about package
    2020  test suites.</para>
    2121
  • chapter07/kernfs.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    8686ln -sv  /proc/self/fd   /dev</userinput></screen>
    8787
     88      <para>In other cases <filename>/dev/shm</filename> is a mountpoint
     89      for a tmpfs. In that case the mount of /dev above will only create
     90      /dev/shm in the chroot environment as a directory. In this situation
     91      we explicitly mount a tmpfs,</para>
     92
     93<screen><userinput>if [ -h $LFS/dev/shm ]; then
     94  mkdir -pv $LFS/$(readlink $LFS/dev/shm)
     95else
     96  mount -t tmpfs -o nosuid,nodev tmpfs $LFS/dev/shm
     97fi</userinput></screen>
     98
    8899  </sect2>
    89100
  • chapter08/binutils.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    161161<screen><userinput remap="test">make -k check</userinput></screen>
    162162
    163 <para>Twelve tests fail in the <command>gold</command> testsuite when the
     163    <para>Twelve tests fail in the <command>gold</command> testsuite when the
    164164    <option>--enable-default-pie</option> and
    165     <option>--enable-default-ssp</option> options are passed to GCC. There
    166     is also a known failure in the <command>as</command> tests.</para>
    167     <!-- Fixed in 2.39
    168          https://sourceware.org/git/?p=binutils-gdb.git;a=commit;h=01ae03b
    169     <para>One gold test, <filename>pr17704a_test</filename>, is known to
    170     fail if <parameter>CONFIG_IA32_EMULATION</parameter> is disabled in the
    171     kernel configuration of the host system.</para>
    172  -->
     165    <option>--enable-default-ssp</option> options are passed to GCC.
     166    <!-- Caused by egrep deprecation.  Note that we don't "patch" temp grep.
     167         And it seems unworthy to add a sed into temp grep just for one test
     168         failure.  (I don't really agree to "patch" grep in the first place,
     169         anyway.) -->
     170    The test named <filename>ar with versioned solib</filename> is also
     171    known to fail.</para>
     172
    173173    <para>Install the package:</para>
    174174
  • chapter08/gcc.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    112112        binary programs that can be loaded anywhere in memory.  Without PIE,
    113113        the security feature named ASLR (Address Space Layout Randomization)
    114         can be applied for the shared libraries, but not the exectutable
     114        can be applied for the shared libraries, but not the executable
    115115        itself.  Enabling PIE allows ASLR for the executables in addition to
    116116        the shared libraries, and mitigates some attacks based on fixed
  • chapter08/libelf.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    5959<screen><userinput remap="test">make check</userinput></screen>
    6060
    61 <!--    <para>One test, run-elfclassify.sh, is known to fail.</para>-->
     61    <para>One test named <filename>run-low_high_pc.sh</filename> is known to
     62    fail on 32-bit x86 system.</para>
    6263
    6364    <para>Install only Libelf:</para>
  • chapter09/systemd-custom.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    4747  </sect2>
    4848
    49   <sect2>
     49  <sect2 id='systemd-no-tmpfs'>
    5050    <title>Disabling tmpfs for /tmp</title>
    5151
  • chapter10/fstab.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    3333tmpfs          /run         tmpfs    defaults            0     0
    3434devtmpfs       /dev         devtmpfs mode=0755,nosuid    0     0
     35tmpfs          /dev/shm     tmpfs    nosuid,nodev        0     0
    3536
    3637# End /etc/fstab</literal>
  • chapter10/kernel.xml

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    118118  Graphics support ---&gt;
    119119   Frame buffer Devices ---&gt;
    120       [*] Support for frame buffer devices ----
     120      &lt;*&gt; Support for frame buffer devices ---&gt;
     121   Console display driver support ---&gt;
     122      [*] Framebuffer Console support [CONFIG_FRAMEBUFFER_CONSOLE]
    121123  Generic Driver Options  ---&gt;
    122124   [ ] Support for uevent helper [CONFIG_UEVENT_HELPER]
     
    157159   Frame buffer Devices ---&gt;
    158160      &lt;*&gt; Support for frame buffer devices ---&gt;
     161   Console display driver support ---&gt;
     162      [*] Framebuffer Console support [CONFIG_FRAMEBUFFER_CONSOLE]
    159163File systems  ---&gt;
    160164   [*] Inotify support for userspace [CONFIG_INOTIFY_USER]
     
    271275
    272276      <varlistentry>
     277        <term><parameter>Framebuffer Console support</parameter></term>
     278        <listitem>
     279          <para>This is needed to display the Linux console on a frame
     280          buffer device.  To allow the kernel to print debug messages at an
     281          early boot stage, it shouldn't be built as a kernel module
     282          unless an initramfs will be used. And, if
     283          <option>CONFIG_DRM</option> (Direct Rendering Manager) is enabled,
     284          it's likely <option>CONFIG_DRM_FBDEV_EMULATION</option> (Enable
     285          legacy fbdev support for your modesetting driver) should be
     286          enabled as well.</para>
     287        </listitem>
     288      </varlistentry>
     289
     290      <varlistentry>
    273291        <term><parameter>Support x2apic</parameter></term>
    274292        <listitem>
     
    318336
    319337    <caution>
    320       <para>As the cross-built LFS system has a separate /boot partition,
    321       the files copied below should go there. The easiest way to do that is
    322       to mount <filename class="directory">/boot</filename> before
    323       proceeding.  As the &root; user:</para>
     338      <para>As the cross-built LFS system has a separate &boot-dir;
     339      partition, the files copied below should go there. The easiest way to
     340      do that is to create the entry for &boot-dir; in &fstab; first (read
     341      the previous section for details), then issue the following command
     342      as the &root; user:</para>
    324343
    325344<screen role="nodump"><userinput>mount /boot</userinput></screen>
  • general.ent

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    122122<!ENTITY root            "<systemitem class='username'>root</systemitem>">
    123123<!ENTITY lfs-user        "<systemitem class='username'>lfs</systemitem>">
     124<!ENTITY fstab           "<filename>/etc/fstab</filename>">
     125<!ENTITY boot-dir        "<filename class='directory'>/boot</filename>">
    124126
    125127<!ENTITY % packages-entities SYSTEM "packages.ent">
  • lfs-latest-git.php

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    302302  }
    303303
     304  if ( $package == "libffi" )
     305     return find_max( $lines, "/v\d/", "/^.*v([\d\.]+)$/" );
     306
    304307  if ( $package == "procps-ng" )
    305308     return find_max( $lines, "/v\d/", "/^.*v([\d\.]+)$/" );
  • packages.ent

    r1f6dfd4 r0ea3431  
    164164<!ENTITY eudev-fin-sbu "0.2 SBU">
    165165
    166 <!ENTITY expat-version "2.4.8">
    167 <!ENTITY expat-size "444 KB">
     166<!ENTITY expat-version "2.4.9">
     167<!ENTITY expat-size "449 KB">
    168168<!ENTITY expat-url "&sourceforge;expat/expat-&expat-version;.tar.xz">
    169 <!ENTITY expat-md5 "0584a7318a4c007f7ec94778799d72fe">
     169<!ENTITY expat-md5 "8d7fcf7d02d08bf79d9ae5c21cc72c03">
    170170<!ENTITY expat-home "https://libexpat.github.io/">
    171171<!ENTITY expat-fin-du "12 MB">
     
    387387<!ENTITY less-fin-sbu "less than 0.1 SBU">
    388388
    389 <!ENTITY lfs-bootscripts-version "20220723">      <!-- Scripts depend on this format -->
     389<!ENTITY lfs-bootscripts-version "20220920">      <!-- Scripts depend on this format -->
    390390<!ENTITY lfs-bootscripts-size "BOOTSCRIPTS-SIZE KB">
    391391<!ENTITY lfs-bootscripts-url "&downloads-root;lfs-bootscripts-&lfs-bootscripts-version;.tar.xz">
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