Changeset c34b4fb


Ignore:
Timestamp:
09/07/2021 08:01:10 PM (8 months ago)
Author:
Pierre Labastie <pierre.labastie@…>
Branches:
11.1, 11.1-rc1, arm, multilib, trunk, xry111/clfs-ng, xry111/lfs-next
Children:
9cea9a2
Parents:
df732b5
Message:

Remove spaces at end o lines - chapterO9

Location:
chapter09
Files:
11 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • chapter09/bootscripts.xml

    rdf732b5 rc34b4fb  
    2525
    2626    <para>The LFS-Bootscripts package contains a set of scripts to start/stop
    27     the LFS system at bootup/shutdown. 
     27    the LFS system at bootup/shutdown.
    2828    The configuration files and procedures needed to
    2929    customize the boot process are described in the following sections.</para>
  • chapter09/consoled.xml

    rdf732b5 rc34b4fb  
    2626  url="http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/HOWTO-INDEX/other-lang.html"/>.
    2727  Examine the output of <command>localectl list-keymaps</command> for a list of
    28   valid console keymaps. Look in the 
     28  valid console keymaps. Look in the
    2929  <filename class="directory">/usr/share/consolefonts</filename>
    3030  directory for valid screen fonts.</para>
  • chapter09/introduction.xml

    rdf732b5 rc34b4fb  
    3030    system.</para>
    3131
    32     <para>The <command>init</command> program is controlled by the 
     32    <para>The <command>init</command> program is controlled by the
    3333    <filename>/etc/inittab</filename> file and is organized into run levels that
    3434    can be run by the user:</para>
     
    6262    <itemizedlist>
    6363      <listitem>
    64           <para>May be slower to boot.  A medium speed base LFS system 
    65           takes 8-12 seconds where the boot time is measured from the 
    66           first kernel message to the login prompt.  Network 
    67           connectivity is typically established about 2 seconds 
     64          <para>May be slower to boot.  A medium speed base LFS system
     65          takes 8-12 seconds where the boot time is measured from the
     66          first kernel message to the login prompt.  Network
     67          connectivity is typically established about 2 seconds
    6868          after the login prompt.</para>
    6969      </listitem>
  • chapter09/locale.xml

    rdf732b5 rc34b4fb  
    8181  before the telephone number in order to get into the country. If any of the
    8282  commands above fail with a message similar to the one shown below, this means
    83   that your locale was either not installed in Chapter&nbsp;8 or is not 
     83  that your locale was either not installed in Chapter&nbsp;8 or is not
    8484  supported by the default installation of Glibc.</para>
    8585
     
    143143  mail with such characters from Mutt or Pine results in non-RFC-conforming
    144144  messages being sent (the charset in the outgoing mail is indicated as <quote>unknown
    145   8-bit</quote>). It's suggested that you use the <quote>C</quote> locale only 
     145  8-bit</quote>). It's suggested that you use the <quote>C</quote> locale only
    146146  if you are certain that you will never need 8-bit characters.</para>
    147147
  • chapter09/network.xml

    rdf732b5 rc34b4fb  
    3232    characteristics such as enp2s1. If you are not sure what your interface
    3333    name is, you can always run <command>ip link</command> or <command>ls
    34     /sys/class/net</command> after you have booted your system. 
     34    /sys/class/net</command> after you have booted your system.
    3535    </para></note>
    3636
     
    158158       <primary sortas="e-/etc/hosts">/etc/hosts</primary>
    159159     </indexterm>
    160    
     160
    161161     <indexterm zone="ch-config-hosts">
    162162       <primary sortas="d-localnet">localnet</primary>
    163163       <secondary>/etc/hosts</secondary>
    164164     </indexterm>
    165    
     165
    166166     <indexterm zone="ch-config-hosts">
    167167       <primary sortas="d-network">network</primary>
    168168       <secondary>/etc/hosts</secondary>
    169169     </indexterm>
    170    
     170
    171171     <para>Decide on the IP address, fully-qualified domain name (FQDN), and
    172172     possible aliases for use in the <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file. The
    173173     syntax is:</para>
    174    
     174
    175175<screen><literal>IP_address myhost.example.org aliases</literal></screen>
    176176
     
    187187     <para>x can be any number in the range 16-31. y can be any number in the
    188188     range 0-255.</para>
    189    
     189
    190190     <para>A valid private IP address could be 192.168.1.1. A valid FQDN for
    191191     this IP could be lfs.example.org.</para>
    192    
     192
    193193     <para>Even if not using a network card, a valid FQDN is still required.
    194194     This is necessary for certain programs to operate correctly.</para>
    195    
     195
    196196     <para>Create the  <filename>/etc/hosts</filename> file by running:</para>
    197197
     
    210210
    211211     <para>The <replaceable>&lt;192.168.1.1&gt;</replaceable>,
    212      <replaceable>&lt;FQDN&gt;</replaceable>, and 
     212     <replaceable>&lt;FQDN&gt;</replaceable>, and
    213213     <replaceable>&lt;HOSTNAME&gt;</replaceable> values need to be
    214214     changed for specific uses or requirements (if assigned an IP address by a
  • chapter09/networkd.xml

    rdf732b5 rc34b4fb  
    3939    <filename class="extension">.netdev</filename> and
    4040    <filename class="extension">.network</filename> files. For detailed
    41     descriptions and example contents of these configuration files, consult 
     41    descriptions and example contents of these configuration files, consult
    4242    the <filename>systemd-link(5)</filename>,
    4343    <filename>systemd-netdev(5)</filename> and
     
    5858        each type of connection.  For example, the classic interface
    5959        name for a wired connection is eth0.  A wireless connection
    60         will usually have the name wifi0 or wlan0. 
     60        will usually have the name wifi0 or wlan0.
    6161      </para>
    6262
     
    7676          <para>
    7777             Create a manual naming scheme, for example by naming the
    78              interfaces something like "internet0", "dmz0", or "lan0". 
    79              To do that, create .link files in /etc/systemd/network/ that 
     78             interfaces something like "internet0", "dmz0", or "lan0".
     79             To do that, create .link files in /etc/systemd/network/ that
    8080             select an explicit name or a better naming scheme for your
    8181             network interfaces. For example:
     
    9292
    9393          <para>
    94              See the man page systemd.link(5) for more information. 
     94             See the man page systemd.link(5) for more information.
    9595          </para>
    9696        </listitem>
     
    9898        <listitem>
    9999          <para>
    100             In /boot/grub/grub.cfg, pass the option net.ifnames=0 on the 
     100            In /boot/grub/grub.cfg, pass the option net.ifnames=0 on the
    101101            kernel command line.
    102102          </para>
     
    210210      There will often be more than one entry (requirements demand secondary
    211211      servers for fallback capability). If you only need or want one DNS server,
    212       remove the second <emphasis>nameserver</emphasis> line from the file. 
     212      remove the second <emphasis>nameserver</emphasis> line from the file.
    213213      The IP address may also be a router on the local network. Another option
    214214      is to use the Google Public DNS service using the IP addresses below as
     
    253253       <primary sortas="e-/etc/hosts">/etc/hosts</primary>
    254254     </indexterm>
    255    
     255
    256256     <indexterm zone="ch-config-hosts">
    257257       <primary sortas="d-localnet">localnet</primary>
    258258       <secondary>/etc/hosts</secondary>
    259259     </indexterm>
    260    
     260
    261261     <indexterm zone="ch-config-hosts">
    262262       <primary sortas="d-network">network</primary>
  • chapter09/profile.xml

    rdf732b5 rc34b4fb  
    104104  before the telephone number in order to get into the country. If any of the
    105105  commands above fail with a message similar to the one shown below, this means
    106   that your locale was either not installed in <xref linkend="ch-system-glibc"/> 
     106  that your locale was either not installed in <xref linkend="ch-system-glibc"/>
    107107  or is not supported by the default installation of Glibc.</para>
    108108
  • chapter09/symlinks.xml

    rdf732b5 rc34b4fb  
    2323    and the Realtek card becomes eth1. In some cases, after a reboot the cards
    2424    could get renumbered the other way around.</para>
    25    
     25
    2626    <para>In the new naming scheme, typical network device names would then
    2727    be something like enp5s0 or wlp3s0.  If this naming convention is not
     
    3131    <sect3>
    3232      <title>Disabling Persistent Naming on the Kernel Command Line</title>
    33    
     33
    3434      <para>The traditional naming scheme using eth0, eth1, etc can be
    35       restored by adding <userinput>net.ifnames=0</userinput> on the 
     35      restored by adding <userinput>net.ifnames=0</userinput> on the
    3636      kernel command line.  This is most appropriate for those systems
    3737      that have only one ethernet device of the same type.  Laptops
    38       often have multiple ethernet connections that are named eth0 and 
    39       wlan0 and are also candidates for this method.  The command line 
    40       is passed in the GRUB configuration file. 
     38      often have multiple ethernet connections that are named eth0 and
     39      wlan0 and are also candidates for this method.  The command line
     40      is passed in the GRUB configuration file.
    4141      See <xref linkend="grub-cfg"/>.</para>
    4242    </sect3>
     
    4444    <sect3>
    4545      <title>Creating Custom Udev Rules</title>
    46    
     46
    4747      <para>The naming scheme can be customized by creating custom udev
    4848      rules.  A script has been included that generates the initial rules.
     
    6262      are not consistently assigned.  In these cases, this method cannot
    6363      be used.</para></note>
    64  
     64
    6565      <para>The file begins with a comment block followed by two lines for each
    6666      NIC. The first line for each NIC is a commented description showing its
     
    7070      interface; this information is only for reference. The second line is the
    7171      udev rule that matches this NIC and actually assigns it a name.</para>
    72  
     72
    7373      <para>All udev rules are made up of several keys, separated by commas and
    7474      optional whitespace. This rule's keys and an explanation of each of them
    7575      are as follows:</para>
    76  
     76
    7777      <itemizedlist>
    7878        <listitem>
     
    107107        </listitem>
    108108      </itemizedlist>
    109  
     109
    110110      <para>The value of <literal>NAME</literal> is the important part. Make sure
    111111      you know which name has been assigned to each of your network cards before
  • chapter09/systemd-custom.xml

    rdf732b5 rc34b4fb  
    5151
    5252    <para>By default, <filename class="directory">/tmp</filename> is created as
    53     a tmpfs. If this is not desired, it can be overridden by executing the 
     53    a tmpfs. If this is not desired, it can be overridden by executing the
    5454    following command:</para>
    5555
     
    5757
    5858    <para>Alternatively, if a separate partition for
    59     <filename class="directory">/tmp</filename> is desired, specify that 
     59    <filename class="directory">/tmp</filename> is desired, specify that
    6060    partition in a <filename>/etc/fstab</filename> entry.</para>
    6161
     
    8282      <listitem><para>systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service</para></listitem>
    8383    </itemizedlist>
    84  
     84
    8585    <para>The system location for the configuration files is
    86     <filename>/usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/*.conf</filename>. The local 
     86    <filename>/usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/*.conf</filename>. The local
    8787    configuration files are in
    8888    <filename class="directory">/etc/tmpfiles.d</filename>. Files in
     
    9595    <para>
    9696      Note that the syntax for the
    97       <filename>/usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/*.conf</filename> files can be 
     97      <filename>/usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/*.conf</filename> files can be
    9898      confusing.  For example, the default deletion of files in the /tmp directory
    99       is located in <filename>/usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/tmp.conf</filename> with 
     99      is located in <filename>/usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/tmp.conf</filename> with
    100100      the line:
    101101
     
    149149    systems, systemd uses a unified format for different types of startup
    150150    files (or units). The command <command>systemctl</command> is used to
    151     enable, disable, control state, and obtain status of unit files. Here 
     151    enable, disable, control state, and obtain status of unit files. Here
    152152    are some examples of frequently used commands:</para>
    153153
  • chapter09/udev.xml

    rdf732b5 rc34b4fb  
    120120      ownership at whatever <systemitem
    121121      class="filesystem">devtmpfs</systemitem> used initially.</para> </sect3>
    122      
     122
    123123    <sect3 id="module-loading">
    124124      <title>Module Loading</title>
     
    224224      <para>Note that the <quote>softdep</quote> command also allows
    225225      <literal>pre:</literal> dependencies, or a mixture of both
    226       <literal>pre:</literal> and <literal>post:</literal> dependencies.  See 
     226      <literal>pre:</literal> and <literal>post:</literal> dependencies.  See
    227227      the <filename>modprobe.d(5)</filename> manual page for more information
    228228      on <quote>softdep</quote> syntax and capabilities.</para>
    229229
    230       <para revision="sysv">If the module in question is not a wrapper and is 
    231       useful by itself, configure the <command>modules</command> bootscript to 
     230      <para revision="sysv">If the module in question is not a wrapper and is
     231      useful by itself, configure the <command>modules</command> bootscript to
    232232      load this module on system boot. To do this, add the module name to the
    233233      <filename>/etc/sysconfig/modules</filename> file on a separate line.
  • chapter09/usage.xml

    rdf732b5 rc34b4fb  
    2525    particular Linux distribution, they should work the same in LFS too. LFS has its
    2626    own way of doing things, but it respects generally accepted standards.</para>
    27  
     27
    2828    <para>SysVinit (which will be referred to as <quote>init</quote> from now on)
    2929    works using a run-levels scheme. There are seven (numbered 0 to 6) run-levels
     
    234234      /sys/class/rtc.</para>
    235235
    236       <para>For information on kernel module loading and udev, see 
     236      <para>For information on kernel module loading and udev, see
    237237      <xref linkend="module-loading"/>.</para>
    238238  </sect2>
     
    536536  <sect2 id="ch-config-createfiles">
    537537    <title>Creating Files at Boot</title>
    538  
     538
    539539    <indexterm zone="ch-config-createfiles">
    540540      <primary sortas="d-createfiles">File creation at boot</primary>
    541541      <secondary>configuring</secondary>
    542542    </indexterm>
    543  
     543
    544544    <para>At times, it is desirable to create files at boot time.  For instance,
    545545    the <filename class="directory">/tmp/.ICE-unix</filename> directory
    546546    is often needed.  This can be done by creating an entry in the
    547547    <filename>/etc/sysconfig/createfiles</filename> configuration script.
    548     The format of this file is embedded in the comments of the default 
     548    The format of this file is embedded in the comments of the default
    549549    configuration file.</para>
    550550  </sect2>
     
    552552  <sect2 id="ch-config-sysklogd">
    553553    <title>Configuring the sysklogd Script</title>
    554  
     554
    555555    <indexterm zone="ch-config-sysklogd">
    556556      <primary sortas="d-sysklogd">sysklogd</primary>
    557557      <secondary>configuring</secondary>
    558558    </indexterm>
    559  
     559
    560560    <para>The <filename>sysklogd</filename> script invokes the
    561561    <command>syslogd</command> program as a part of System V initialization.  The
     
    575575  <sect2 id="ch-config-site">
    576576    <title>The rc.site File</title>
    577  
     577
    578578    <indexterm zone="ch-config-site">
    579579      <primary sortas="a-rc.site">rc.site</primary>
    580580    </indexterm>
    581  
     581
    582582    <para>The optional <filename>/etc/sysconfig/rc.site</filename> file contains
    583583    settings that are automatically set for each SystemV boot script.  It can
     
    588588    <filename>rc.site</filename>, the values in the script specific files have
    589589    precedence. </para>
    590  
     590
    591591    <para><filename>rc.site</filename> also contains parameters that can
    592592    customize other aspects of the boot process.  Setting the IPROMPT variable
    593593    will enable selective running of bootscripts.  Other options are described
    594594    in the file comments.  The default version of the file is as follows:</para>
    595  
     595
    596596    <!-- Use role to fix a pdf generation problem -->
    597597    <screen role="auto">&site;</screen>
    598  
     598
    599599    <sect3>
    600600      <title>Customizing the Boot and Shutdown Scripts</title>
    601  
     601
    602602      <para>The LFS boot scripts boot and shut down a system in a fairly
    603603      efficient manner, but there are a few tweaks that you can make in the
     
    605605      to your preferences. To do this, adjust the settings in
    606606      the <filename>/etc/sysconfig/rc.site</filename> file above.</para>
    607  
     607
    608608      <itemizedlist>
    609  
     609
    610610      <listitem><para>During the boot script <filename>udev</filename>, there is
    611611      a call to <command>udev settle</command> that requires some time to
     
    614614      card, the boot process will probably not need to wait for this command.  To
    615615      skip it, set the variable OMIT_UDEV_SETTLE=y.</para></listitem>
    616  
     616
    617617      <listitem><para>The boot script <filename>udev_retry</filename> also runs
    618618      <command>udev settle</command> by default.  This command is only needed by
     
    623623      needed.  Skip the command by setting the variable OMIT_UDEV_RETRY_SETTLE=y.
    624624      </para></listitem>
    625  
     625
    626626      <listitem><para>By default, the file system checks are silent.  This can
    627627      appear to be a delay during the bootup process.  To turn on the
    628628      <command>fsck</command> output, set the variable VERBOSE_FSCK=y.
    629629      </para></listitem>
    630  
     630
    631631      <listitem><para>When rebooting, you may want to skip the filesystem check,
    632632      <command>fsck</command>, completely.  To do this, either create the file
     
    637637      the <parameter>-F</parameter> parameter instead of <parameter>-f</parameter>.
    638638      </para>
    639  
     639
    640640      <para>Setting the variable FASTBOOT=y will disable <command>fsck</command>
    641641      during the boot process until it is removed.  This is not recommended
    642642      on a permanent basis.</para></listitem>
    643  
     643
    644644      <listitem><para>Normally, all files in the <filename
    645645      class='directory'>/tmp</filename> directory are deleted at boot time.
     
    647647      noticeable delay in the boot process.  To skip removing these files set the
    648648      variable SKIPTMPCLEAN=y.</para></listitem>
    649  
     649
    650650      <listitem><para>During shutdown, the <command>init</command> program sends
    651651      a TERM signal to each program it has started (e.g. agetty), waits for a set
     
    659659      script can be skipped by setting the parameter
    660660      KILLDELAY=0.</para></listitem>
    661  
     661
    662662      </itemizedlist>
    663  
     663
    664664    </sect3>
    665665  </sect2>
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